As Colombia votes via referendum on its historic peace deal with the The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a key question that needs to be asked, writes Vanda Felbab-Brown, is who pays for Colombia’s peace, not only financially but also politically, which she explores in a new paper.

As Colombia votes via referendum on its historic peace deal with the The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a key question that needs to be asked, writes Vanda Felbab-Brown, is who pays for Colombia’s peace, not only financially but also politically, which she explores in a new paper.

The country's historic peace deal means thousands of female fighters are giving up their weapons. But what happens then?

To Be a Guerrilla, and a Woman, in Colombia

The country's historic peace deal means thousands of female fighters are giving up their weapons. But what happens then?

El legado de Fidel: balance económico social en 2016 | Nueva Sociedad

El legado de Fidel: balance económico social en 2016 | Nueva Sociedad

The government’s peace deal with the FARC rebel group just met a Brexit-style demise. Here’s why it went off the rails.

The government’s peace deal with the FARC rebel group just met a Brexit-style demise. Here’s why it went off the rails.

A side effect of peace in Colombia? A cocaine boom in the U.S. - The Washington Post

A side effect of peace in Colombia? A cocaine boom in the U.S.

A side effect of peace in Colombia? A cocaine boom in the U.S. - The Washington Post

Colombian president loved abroad, but struggles locally | The Sacramento Bee

Colombian president loved abroad, but struggles locally | The Sacramento Bee

Washington, D.C., April 24, 2017 - Ten years ago, Chiquita Brands International became the first U.S.-based corporation convicted of violating a U.S. law against funding an international terrorist group—the paramilitary United Self-defense Forces of Colombia (AUC). But punishment for the crime was reserved only for the corporate entity, while the names of the individual company officials who engineered the payments have since remained hidden behind a wall of impunity.

Washington, D.C., April 24, 2017 - Ten years ago, Chiquita Brands International became the first U.S.-based corporation convicted of violating a U.S. law against funding an international terrorist group—the paramilitary United Self-defense Forces of Colombia (AUC). But punishment for the crime was reserved only for the corporate entity, while the names of the individual company officials who engineered the payments have since remained hidden behind a wall of impunity.

No al acuerdo de paz:  Explicar el fracaso | Opinión | EL PAÍS

Explicar el fracaso

No al acuerdo de paz: Explicar el fracaso | Opinión | EL PAÍS

Voters said “no” to peace in Colombia. What’s next? | Brookings Institution

Voters said “no” to peace in Colombia. What’s next? | Brookings Institution

In the hardscrabble town of Puerto Asís, residents are split on a historic accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

Why Colombia Said No to Peace

In the hardscrabble town of Puerto Asís, residents are split on a historic accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

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