There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!

COMMONPLACE BOOK

down with death


COMMONPLACE BOOK

  • 46 Pins

"I've got cabin fever!" "I've got it tewwww!"

After witnessing the first ever nuclear test in 1945, J. Robert Oppenheimer was reminded of the words of the Bhagavad Gita: "now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." The atomic bomb is a neat symbol for death: immensely powerful, impossible to resist, terrifying to behold. The bomb was held over the heads of the world's citizens during the Cold War in much the same way that death is held over the heads of humanity: it could happen at any time, and you cannot stop it.

Radiohead -- "Exit Music (For A Film)". I died and went to alt-rock heaven when the bassline came in and facilitated the climax. Thom Yorke is basically getting his Romeo and Juliet on with these lyrics about star-crossed and (therefore) suicidal lovers: "You can laugh a spineless laugh / We hope your rules and wisdom choke you / Now we are one in everlasting peace / We hope that you choke, that you choke / We hope that you choke, that you choke"

Richard Alpert discovers he is aging. Alpert had been granted the gift of agelessness by Jacob. When Jacob is killed, Alpert tries to kill himself because he believes the last 150 years of his life have been meaningless. This proves impossible, and through Hurley, his dead wife tells him that he still has work to do: he must keep the man in black from leaving the island. When the man in black is killed, Alpert finds a grey hair on his head; this causes him to realize that he wants to live.

  • Becca Lowry
    Becca Lowry

    I am so glad you made a post about this character- Alpert was an amazing character. As tortured as he was, I thought he represented something that made him one of the most easily relatable characters on the show- that is the gift of immortality. Alpert does accomplish a great deal but he has to sacrifice a huge amount- mostly psychologically- through all the sacrifices he has to make for the island. It definitely makes you question your beliefs and/or what you consider to be most important.

One of the most gut-wrenching films I've ever seen. It takes place during WWII, the main character, Bruno is the son of a nazi officer and their family lives near a concentration camp. One day Bruno finds the fence surrounding the camp, on the other side of the fence is a boy named Shmuel, who Bruno thinks is wearing "pajamas," he does not know that Shmuel is Jewish and all his father tells him is that "those people are in the camps because they are the enemy."

  • Becca Lowry
    Becca Lowry

    The main message about the film is about how war/anti-semitism is wrong but the way that this film sticks out compared to other Holocaust films is that it shows how as much as people want to protect their children from witnessing war and death, if they keep them totally ignorant about it, it could lead to much more disastrous results than they would have thought otherwise.

An amazing, poetic (and quite depressing) film about a man dying from cancer who is struggling to atone for his role as a black marketer in the little time he has left. The film does a great job showing how fragile life can be and how the smallest choice (which you might think does not impact others that much) can change their lives far more than you might notice or think about.

from Saturday Morning Breakfast Cartoons - calls on that conservation of energy idea, the expression of continuation at the end of some of the poems included on this board comes out here too.

Lauren's Emily Dickinson pin reminded me of this poem by Anne Bronte called "Farewell".

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    I guess this is a share-a-lot night for me? But I had a friend who died my junior year of high school, and her sister picked the first stanza of this poem for her grave marker - so you can see why this poem has significant ties to death for me (and I guess this is all appropriate to bring up since it deals with female friendship, too). But, to bring it back to the Dickinson poem, Anne Bronte wrote this around the same time but maintained that optimistic, happier note we see in the Wheatley and Wright poems. It has that endless feeling we see in the dash at the end of Dickinson's poem, but manages to end on a final note, as if this continuity cannot be disputed.

*Azevedo's Ice Sculptures of Melting Men. Global warming is a far more immediate issue when you're made of ice.

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    My calc teacher in high school was named Azevedo... I asked her to write one of my recommendations and we ended up having a long discussion about feminism, and how hard it is to be a female academic in a subject generally run by men. She'd get in front of a crowd at an academic conference and said that no one would be paying attention to her. When I look at this image I picture her talking about calc with her audience melting and melting.

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    BUT ANYWAY. this is gorgeous. speaks to how fleeting life is, and how dependent it is on interaction with the world around you. I think the poems we chose try to deflect that because it places too much blame on the parent, though the S. Wright poem does speak to how dangerous the human world is to life.

Art for GD album "Blues for Allah" (1975). What does their name mean? According to bassist Phil Lesh, "Jerry picked up an old World Language Dictionary, and in that silvery elf-voice he said to me, 'Hey man, how about the Grateful Dead?'" The definition there was "the soul of a dead person, or his angel, showing gratitude to someone who, as an act of charity, arranged their burial." In the Garcia biography, Captain Trips, author Sandy Troy states that the band was smoking DMT at the time.

"Black Peter" -- The Grateful Dead.. This song embodies the melancholy pleasures of dying. Black Peter is a reference to the traditional counterparts of St Nicholas, who carry bundles of switches with which to beat naughty children. Thank you Jerry!

When Jedi die, they hang around as translucent images who offer reassuring looks of peace and understanding. At LucasFilms, creativity never dies, and shitty actors can be retroactively inserted as ghosts into movies that were filmed before they were born.

There sure is a lot of food and dresses on pinterest. Heres a recipe for what are called Dementor's Kiss Bread Twists: 1/2 packet or 1 1/8 teas. rapid rise yeast + 1/4 teas. sugar + 1 tbsp warm water + 2 teas. olive oil + 1 1/2 cups flour + 1/2 teas. pow­dered gar­lic + 1 head fresh gar­lic, minced + 2 tbsp. mar­garine, melted sea salt to sprinkle

A very unique film about a comet that is about to hit earth and completely obliterate it; Kirsten Dunst plays a depressed woman who is strangely enough looking forward to the inevitable apocalypse while her sister falls all to pieces over it. The film poses an interesting question though; would knowing that your inevitable death in such a scenario be comforting or push you into a nervous breakdown?

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    Loved this movie. Really loved this movie. I think we see Kirsten Dunst go through that nervous breakdown - one of the fun lines of the movie was "it tastes like ashes" - but she ultimately just accepts what's going to happen to her and her family. I think one of the most interesting points to talk about in regards to our board and this movie is how impending death is explained to the son/nephew - his mother tries to save him, and weirdly Kirsten does too by making that fort. On the one hand, his mother is terrorizing him by trying to prolong his life; Kirsten is comforting him by facilitating its end. Lot of questions raised in this movie, I'm glad you brought it up.

La Vita é Bella is a miraculously beautiful film about the Italian holocaust during WWII - it deals heavily with death, loss, grieving, and the fleeting value of human life.

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    always wanted to see it. for a long time all I knew about it was "bonjourno principessa!" and didn't hear about the WWII element until fairly recently.

  • Becca Lowry
    Becca Lowry

    I've seen this movie a few times; for a WWII movie, it is surprisingly uplifting (it definitely has it's dark, serious moments) but for the most part it has a very sweet, family oriented message to it. The ending is terribly heart-wrenching and bitter sweet but if anything it helps you realize how fragile life is and how important it is to protect your family, no matter what the cost.

thought this was in the humanist spirit of Easter

Very interesting Evanescence song about death and the afterlife.

A ballerina, death or both?

End? No, the journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path... One that we all must take. The grey rain-curtain of this world rolls back and all turns to silver glass... And then you see it. White shores... And beyond, a far green country under a swift sunrise.

  • MacKenzie
    MacKenzie

    Gandalf is truly a wise wizard, and his author Tolkien was a genius - his conception of death as a second part of the human journey that takes us to a place of unimagined beauty and peace is comforting and, though it could be interpreted as similar to a Christian idea of heaven, it seems to be a distinctly unique view of death in that here, death is perceived as positive. It is not an end at all, but rather a means.

Beck--"Earthquake Weather". This song is my effing jam right here. Unfortunately the only Beck version on YouTube is a poor qual live concert, so this Asian kid will do fine. The chorus is: "I push, I pull, the days go slow / Into a void we fill with death / And noise, at last, falls off their maps / All cured of pain and doubt / In your little brain". For further satisfaction check out the studio cut from "Guero", or watch the other YouTube cover on piano: it's better just no vocals.

  • Mike Maloney
    Mike Maloney

    I am all about the vibes on Sea Change. Good musicians/artists know there's not much point avoiding negative emotions, when they can be such excellent points from which to climax and achieve resolution. (His strings are mostly laid down by his dad, random FYI.) Beck has the same great quality of bands like Ween and Radiohead--the uncanny ability to reinvent their respective "sounds" for just about every album they put out, and rarely lose my interest doing it.

This crazy old guy is JG Ballard, and he's a great, great sci fi author (he wrote Crash) and if any of you have the time, you have to read 'Manhole 69'. #scifi

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    Here's a link fora full PDF, the story I'm talking about starts on page 21 and isn't too long (aka will be a good distraction from a paper or other hw): http://lowres.uno.edu/sanmi... 'Manhole 69' is about an experiment in which the need for sleep is eliminated for three volunteers. The story focuses on this adjustment from sleep to sleeplessness, and both how and if you remain human under these circumstances. Sleep in this story is accurately described as your only escape from yourself - when you are awake, you are never alone from your thoughts. Sleep is often a metaphor for death, and I think you could make the argument for the necessity of each.

  • Mike Maloney
    Mike Maloney

    I can tell you from experience that things get awfully fishy upstairs in Snell when you've been there for 4 days straight with no sleep. lol

"Innocence And Loyalty- pencil Richard Klingbeil"

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    These poems seem to mourn and celebrate innocence. I love this photo because yes, it's innocent, but look at how the muscles and bones of the child are shaded - I can't help thinking of shadows, and of the inescapable aging body.

"In 1994, Oregon became the first state to legalize physician-assisted suicide. As a result, any individual whom two physicians diagnose as having less than six months to live can lawfully request a fatal dose of barbiturate to end his or her life."

  • Katie Crimms
    Katie Crimms

    I only caught the last 20 min or so of the documentary on HBO but it is TRAGIC. It's centered on this woman in Oregon who chooses to end her life, and the scene where I started watching, she was giving away her clothes to a friend and cooking her last meal with her son. But she insisted she was happy in her decision, and it was clear how much pain she was in. Do we celebrate death because it removes us from the hardships of this life? Is this something positive to grab on to, especially when losing an infant?