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Historical Events in America

Nothing has captured the important historical events in America’s past like the nation’s newspapers. From eye-witness accounts of historical events to in-depth profiles of the country’s leaders, thinkers and trend-setters, you will find something here to interest and inform you.
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Photo: publicity photo of Elvis Presley promoting the film "Jailhouse Rock," 1957. Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.; U.S. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “The ‘King’ Is Gone: Elvis Presley Dies at Age 42.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/the-king-is-gone-elvis-presley-dies-at-age-42.html

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Photo: publicity photo of Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale and American canine performer Terry as Toto in "The Wizard of Oz." Credit: NBC Television Network; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “‘The Wizard of Oz’ Premieres.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/the-wizard-of-oz-premieres.html

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Photo: Wizard of Oz movie poster, 1939. Credit: MGM; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “‘The Wizard of Oz’ Premieres.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/the-wizard-of-oz-premieres.html

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Photo: UN delegate Lieut. Gen. William K. Harrison, Jr. (seated left), and Korean People’s Army and Chinese People’s Volunteers delegate Gen. Nam Il (seated right) signing the Korean War armistice agreement at P’anmunjŏm, Korea, 27 July 1953. Credit: F. Kazukaitis, U.S. Department of Defense; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Signing of Armistice Ends Korean War.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/signing-of-armistice-ends-korean-war.html

Signing of Armistice Ends Korean War

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Photo: a gun crew checks their equipment near the Kum River, 15 July 1950. Credit: U.S. Signal Corps; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Signing of Armistice Ends Korean War.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/signing-of-armistice-ends-korean-war.html

Signing of Armistice Ends Korean War

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Photo: a farmer and his sons walking in the face of a dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, April 1936. Credit: Arthur Rothstein, for the Farm Security Administration; Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “It’s a Heat Wave: Your Ancestor’s Miserable Summer of 1936.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/were-having-a-heat-wave-your-ancestors-miserable-summer-of-1936.html

It’s a Heat Wave: Your Ancestor’s Miserable Summer of 1936

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Portrait: Rachel Jackson, by John Chester Buttre. Credit: U.S. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Did I Know That? Unparalleled Shock & Grief in 1828.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/did-i-know-that-unparalleled-shock-grief-in-1828.html

Did I Know That? Unparalleled Shock & Grief in 1828

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Portrait: Aaron Burr, by Gilbert Stuart, c. 1793. Credit: New Jersey Historical Society; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Deadly Duel: Vice President Aaron Burr Kills Alexander Hamilton.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/deadly-duel-vice-president-aaron-burr-kills-alexander-hamilton.html

Deadly Duel: Vice President Aaron Burr Kills Alexander Hamilton

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Portrait: Alexander Hamilton, by John Trumbull, 1806. Credit: Washington University Law School; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Deadly Duel: Vice President Aaron Burr Kills Alexander Hamilton.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/deadly-duel-vice-president-aaron-burr-kills-alexander-hamilton.html

Deadly Duel: Vice President Aaron Burr Kills Alexander Hamilton

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Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather balloon after launching. Credit: NOAA Photo Library; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Did a UFO Crash in Roswell, New Mexico?” https://blog.genealogybank.com/did-a-ufo-crash-in-roswell-new-mexico.html

Did a UFO Crash in Roswell, New Mexico?

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Painting: “Battle of Bunker Hill,” by Howard Pyle, c. 1897. Source: Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Nathaniel Hayford’s Story – Veteran of the Battle of Bunker Hill.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/nathaniel-hayfords-story-veteran-of-the-battle-of-bunker-hill.html

Nathaniel Hayford’s Story – Veteran of the Battle of Bunker Hill

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Painting: Joseph Smith, Jr., painter unknown, c. 1842. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Illinois Mob Murders Joseph Smith Jr., Mormon Leader.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/illinois-mob-murders-joseph-smith-jr-mormon-leader.html

Illinois Mob Murders Joseph Smith Jr., Mormon Leader

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Photo: students pledging to the flag, 1899, 8th Division, Washington, D.C. Credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Flag Day: ‘Under God’ Added to Pledge of Allegiance.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/flag-day-under-god-added-to-pledge-of-allegiance.html

Flag Day: ‘Under God’ Added to Pledge of Allegiance

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Coverage of the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, published in the Seattle Daily Times (Seattle, Washington), 5 June 1968, page 1. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Robert F. Kennedy Dies after Shooting.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/robert-f-kennedy-dies-after-shooting.html

Robert F. Kennedy Dies after Shooting

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Photo: Robert F. Kennedy, 19 August 1964. Credit: Library of Congress; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Robert F. Kennedy Dies after Shooting.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/robert-f-kennedy-dies-after-shooting.html

Robert F. Kennedy Dies after Shooting

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Painting: “Captain James Lawrence, USN (1781-1813)” by J. Herring. Credit: Naval History & Heritage Command, United States Navy; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Dying Captain’s Last Words: ‘Don’t Give Up the Ship!’” https://blog.genealogybank.com/dying-captains-last-words-dont-give-up-the-ship.html

Dying Captain’s Last Words: ‘Don’t Give Up the Ship!’

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Photo: RMS Lusitania. Credit: George Grantham Bain; Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Survival Stories from the Lusitania Disaster.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/survival-stories-from-the-lusitania-disaster.html

Survival Stories from the Lusitania Disaster

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Photo: crash of the dirigible “Hindenburg” on 6 May 1937 at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. Credit: Murray Becker/Associated Press; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Hindenburg Disaster Ends the Airship Era.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/hindenburg-disaster-ends-the-airship-era.html

Hindenburg Disaster Ends the Airship Era

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Photo: Rock Island locomotive #627, c. 1880. Credit: William Edward Hook; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “First Train Robbery in U.S. History?” https://blog.genealogybank.com/first-train-robbery-in-u-s-history.html

First Train Robbery in U.S. History?

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Photo: Rancho de Carricitos, the site of the Thornton skirmish. Credit: Pi3.124; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “‘Thornton Affair’ Triggers Mexican-American War.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/thornton-affair-triggers-mexican-american-war.html

‘Thornton Affair’ Triggers Mexican-American War

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Photo: Jonathan Harrington. Source: Pinterest. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Battle of Lexington: We Were There – Get All of Our Stories.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/battle-of-lexington-we-were-there-get-all-of-our-stories.html

Battle of Lexington: We Were There – Get All of Our Stories

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Photo: the Titanic Memorial located on the Southwest Waterfront in Washington, D.C. Credit: AgnosticPreachersKid; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Women’s Titanic Memorial Fund.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/womens-titanic-memorial-fund.html

Women’s Titanic Memorial Fund

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Photo: Confederate flag flying over Fort Sumter, 15 April 1861. Credit: Alma A. Pelot; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Fort Sumter Surrenders, Ending the Civil War’s First Battle.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/fort-sumter-surrenders-ending-the-civil-wars-first-battle.html

Fort Sumter Surrenders, Ending the Civil War’s First Battle

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Painting: “Bombardment of Fort Sumter” by Currier & Ives. Credit: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Fort Sumter Attack Begins the Civil War.” https://blog.genealogybank.com/fort-sumter-attack-begins-the-civil-war.html

Fort Sumter Attack Begins the Civil War

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Painting: “Signing the Alaska Treaty of Cessation” by Emanuel Leutze (from left to right: Robert S. Chew, U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward, William Hunter, Mr. Bodisco, Russian Ambassador Baron de Stoeckl, Charles Sumner, Fredrick W. Seward). Source: Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Seward’s Alaska Purchase Not ‘Folly.’” https://blog.genealogybank.com/sewards-alaska-purchase-not-folly.html

Seward’s Alaska Purchase Not ‘Folly’

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