Historical Events in America

Nothing has captured the important historical events in America’s past like the nation’s newspapers. From eye-witness accounts of historical events to in-depth profiles of the country’s leaders, thinkers and trend-setters, you will find something here to interest and inform you.
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Photo: the Garrett farmhouse near Port Royal, Virginia, where John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, died on the porch. Credit: National Park Service; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Photo: the Garrett farmhouse near Port Royal, Virginia, where John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, died on the porch. Credit: National Park Service; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Photo: John Wilkes Booth, c. 1865. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Photo: John Wilkes Booth, c. 1865. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Illustration: “Assassination of Abraham Lincoln” by Currier and Ives, 1865. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Illustration: “Assassination of Abraham Lincoln” by Currier and Ives, 1865. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Lincoln’s Assassin, John Wilkes Booth, Shot Dead” https://blog.genealogybank.com/lincolns-assassin-john-wilkes-booth-shot-dead.html

Photo: Frank E. Webner, Pony Express rider, c. 1861. Credit: U.S. National Archives & Records Administration. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “A Western Legend Is Born: First Pony Express Ride” https://blog.genealogybank.com/a-western-legend-is-born-first-pony-express-ride.html

Photo: Frank E. Webner, Pony Express rider, c. 1861. Credit: U.S. National Archives & Records Administration. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “A Western Legend Is Born: First Pony Express Ride” https://blog.genealogybank.com/a-western-legend-is-born-first-pony-express-ride.html

Photo: John Jacob Astor IV in 1909. He was the wealthiest person aboard the Titanic. Credit:  Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Honeymooning on the Titanic” https://blog.genealogybank.com/honeymooning-on-the-titanic.html

Photo: John Jacob Astor IV in 1909. He was the wealthiest person aboard the Titanic. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Honeymooning on the Titanic” https://blog.genealogybank.com/honeymooning-on-the-titanic.html

Photo: RMS Titanic departing Southampton on 10 April 1912. Credit: F.G.O. Stuart; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Honeymooning on the Titanic” https://blog.genealogybank.com/honeymooning-on-the-titanic.html

Photo: RMS Titanic departing Southampton on 10 April 1912. Credit: F.G.O. Stuart; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “Honeymooning on the Titanic” https://blog.genealogybank.com/honeymooning-on-the-titanic.html

Photo: the immediate aftermath of the shooting of President Reagan. The president has just been hustled into the limousine while guards move in on the gunman. Credit: Ronald Reagan Library; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “On This Day: President Ronald Reagan Shot!” https://blog.genealogybank.com/on-this-day-president-ronald-reagan-shot.html

Photo: the immediate aftermath of the shooting of President Reagan. The president has just been hustled into the limousine while guards move in on the gunman. Credit: Ronald Reagan Library; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “On This Day: President Ronald Reagan Shot!” https://blog.genealogybank.com/on-this-day-president-ronald-reagan-shot.html

Portrait: President Ronald Reagan. Credit: Executive Office of the President of the United States; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “On This Day: President Ronald Reagan Shot!” https://blog.genealogybank.com/on-this-day-president-ronald-reagan-shot.html

Portrait: President Ronald Reagan. Credit: Executive Office of the President of the United States; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “On This Day: President Ronald Reagan Shot!” https://blog.genealogybank.com/on-this-day-president-ronald-reagan-shot.html

Illustration: American infantry attack at the Battle of Lundy's Lane, War of 1812, 25 July 1814. Credit: New York State Military Museum; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “War of 1812 Recruitment Advertisements: What Induced Your Ancestor to Serve?” https://blog.genealogybank.com/war-of-1812-recruitment-advertisements-what-induced-your-ancestor-to-serve.html

Illustration: American infantry attack at the Battle of Lundy's Lane, War of 1812, 25 July 1814. Credit: New York State Military Museum; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “War of 1812 Recruitment Advertisements: What Induced Your Ancestor to Serve?” https://blog.genealogybank.com/war-of-1812-recruitment-advertisements-what-induced-your-ancestor-to-serve.html

Photo: a Laufmaschine, c. 1820, on display at the Kurpfälzisches Museum in Heidelberg, Germany. Credit: Gun Powder Ma; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “The Tracena: America’s First Bicycle” https://blog.genealogybank.com/the-tracena-americas-first-bicycle.html

Photo: a Laufmaschine, c. 1820, on display at the Kurpfälzisches Museum in Heidelberg, Germany. Credit: Gun Powder Ma; Wikimedia Commons. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “The Tracena: America’s First Bicycle” https://blog.genealogybank.com/the-tracena-americas-first-bicycle.html

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