George Dearing

George Dearing

New York,USA / father & husband | sustainability | real food | real estate | policy watcher | short-order cook | @UHouston alum | georgedearing.com / sustainablyspeaking.com
George Dearing
More ideas from George
There's a strong business case for clean energy.

There's a strong business case for clean energy.

Wind Power is now America’s largest source of renewable energy.

Wind Power is now America’s largest source of renewable energy.

Where Are Millennials Buying Homes

Where Are Millennials Buying Homes

Number of people in extreme poverty fell by 137,000 since yesterday”  Every day in the last 25 years.

Number of people in extreme poverty fell by 137,000 since yesterday” Every day in the last 25 years.

"Tesla’s Model S takes on average 87 days to sell after being listed and the sale price was on average 3 to 5% closer to the list price than most other vehicles.  What is interesting here is that they can not only look at the same segment, like with retained value in the previous study, but also at less expensive vehicles and see just how quick Tesla vehicles move off the lots.  For the study, Alex Klein, VP of Data Science at Autolist, analyzed data from over 10 million vehicles and came to…

"Tesla’s Model S takes on average 87 days to sell after being listed and the sale price was on average 3 to 5% closer to the list price than most other vehicles. What is interesting here is that they can not only look at the same segment, like with retained value in the previous study, but also at less expensive vehicles and see just how quick Tesla vehicles move off the lots. For the study, Alex Klein, VP of Data Science at Autolist, analyzed data from over 10 million vehicles and came to…

"The U.S. solar industry currently has more than 260,000 workers nationwide, according to The Solar Foundation. Their executive director, Andrea Luecke, points out that’s more workers than “Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon combined.” (As a point of clarification, Amazon has added jobs at a torrid pace in the last couple of years, so the 260,000 solar jobs is ‘only’ more than Apple, Google, and Facebook combined.)"

"The U.S. solar industry currently has more than 260,000 workers nationwide, according to The Solar Foundation. Their executive director, Andrea Luecke, points out that’s more workers than “Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon combined.” (As a point of clarification, Amazon has added jobs at a torrid pace in the last couple of years, so the 260,000 solar jobs is ‘only’ more than Apple, Google, and Facebook combined.)"

"The wealth-accumulator categories were defined using the same criteria and formula used in The Millionaire Next Door. The key findings from the paper were that those who were successful at accumulating wealth frequently exhibited the following behaviors:  Spending less than they earned Having a long-term outlook on their financial future Maintaining sound financial records Keeping up with financial markets Saving regardless of income level"

"The wealth-accumulator categories were defined using the same criteria and formula used in The Millionaire Next Door. The key findings from the paper were that those who were successful at accumulating wealth frequently exhibited the following behaviors: Spending less than they earned Having a long-term outlook on their financial future Maintaining sound financial records Keeping up with financial markets Saving regardless of income level"

"Urban planners and economists focused on creativity and networks have been singing the praises of the city-living since the Great Recession (or, perhaps, since forever). But local housing policy, limited family finances, and American geographical abundance—not to mention the pro-rural laws of U.S. representative government—are powerful centrifugal forces that push Americans ever-outward into suburbs with lawns, trucks, and cul de sacs. The last decade was a dream. It’s 2006, again."

"Urban planners and economists focused on creativity and networks have been singing the praises of the city-living since the Great Recession (or, perhaps, since forever). But local housing policy, limited family finances, and American geographical abundance—not to mention the pro-rural laws of U.S. representative government—are powerful centrifugal forces that push Americans ever-outward into suburbs with lawns, trucks, and cul de sacs. The last decade was a dream. It’s 2006, again."

"Urban planners and economists focused on creativity and networks have been singing the praises of the city-living since the Great Recession (or, perhaps, since forever). But local housing policy, limited family finances, and American geographical abundance—not to mention the pro-rural laws of U.S. representative government—are powerful centrifugal forces that push Americans ever-outward into suburbs with lawns, trucks, and cul de sacs. The last decade was a dream. It’s 2006, again.  The…

"Urban planners and economists focused on creativity and networks have been singing the praises of the city-living since the Great Recession (or, perhaps, since forever). But local housing policy, limited family finances, and American geographical abundance—not to mention the pro-rural laws of U.S. representative government—are powerful centrifugal forces that push Americans ever-outward into suburbs with lawns, trucks, and cul de sacs. The last decade was a dream. It’s 2006, again. The…