accio-forest: Sangre de Cristos, New Mexico by Alien Trees...

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View of the Zuni Pueblo in 1873, New Mexico

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Since we were stationed at Fort Bliss, El Paso we spent alot of time in New Mexico. Ruidoso (skiing), Carlsbad Caverns, Albuquerque, Roswell, Raton, Old Mesilla, Las Cruces were our favorite places. We've since gone back several times to visit Santa Fe, Angel Fire (skiing), Capulin Volcano, and Albuquerque.

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New Mexico

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"Eye 25" a sign i found that i did a painting on…

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New Mexico Door

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Red gate in Santa Fe.

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The Rio Grande Theatre in Las Cruces, NM

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Las Cruces, NM

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Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico | Mike Menefee Photography

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We love fry bread. Four Corners

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Yucca

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My New Mexico sky

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Las Cruces, NM

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Mesilla, New Mexico

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New Mexico state

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Roadrunner at back fence here in Las Cruces, NM

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Mesilla Valley & Las Cruces, NM (with Organ Mountains in the background)

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the Rio Grande...New Mexico

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White Sands National Monument, New Mexico; photo by Igor Menaker

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White Sands National Monument, New Mexido, Sand-Storm  |  Danilo Faria

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Crescent moon and sunrise, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexiico

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Mesilla, NM.

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Moonrise behind the Organ Mountains, Las Cruces, NM (Robin Zielinski-Sun News)

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Socorro County, New Mexico Socorro was originally the name given to a Native American village by Don Juan de Oñate in 1598. Having received vitally needed food and assistance from the native population, Oñate named the pueblo Socorro ("succor" in English).

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