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    Women's History


    Women's History

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    Check out this blog post about Viola Gentry, one of the early female pilots to pave the way for future women who wished to take to the sky!

    Viola Gentry, the “Flying Cashier”

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    Viola Gentry, the “Flying Cashier”

    Viola Gentry, the “Flying Cashier”

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    Lucy Burns was an American suffragist women's rights advocate. In 1917 she was imprisoned at Occoquan Workhouse for protesting, picketing, marching at the White House. She endured the “Night of Terror” by the guards. The women were treated brutally were refused medical attention. Of the well-known suffragists of the era, Burns spent the most time in jail. Photo by Harris Ewing. ~Fighting for Our Rights.

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    Sybil Ludington (1761-1839) A young American patriot, Sybil Ludington is the female counterpart to the more famous Paul Revere. Born in 1761 in Connecticut, Ludington was the eldest of twelve children. Soon after her birth, her family settled in Dutchess County, New York. In addition to being a farmer, Ludington’s father held various positions within the small town and served in the military for over sixty years.

    Education & Resources - National Women's History Museum - NWHM

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    Women's Suffrage Protestors Taken to Prison National Woman's Party White House Protests, 1917 National Woman's Party protestors are taken from the D.C. Court House to prison after their conviction in connection with White House protests for women's suffrage, 1917.

    Weekly Women in History Pictures

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    On the eve of Woodrow Wilson’s 1913 inauguration, Alice Paul organized over 8,000 women in a march down Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capitol to the White House. Troops were called to help the suffragists get to their destination but it was 7 more years before women voted for the first time in the 1920 presidential election. The fight took 72 years, spanning two centuries, 18 presidencies, and three wars. Go Alice!

    Lakewood Public Library (Lakewood, Ohio)

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    “The Real Cleopatra Jones" - Saundra Brown, 28, the first black woman on the Oakland police force gets instructions on how to shoot a shotgun, 1970.

    Tryin' Times - blackhistoryalbum: THE REAL CLEOPATRA JONES |...

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    Embroidered banner of the suffragist movement

    Forward Into Light: 1916

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    Laura Ingalls Wilder --

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    Lucy Stone. 1st woman in America to keep her last name upon marriage, 1st Massachusets woman to graduate college, chopped her hair off, scandalously wore precursors to pants, was kicked out of church for arguing that women had the right to own property and to be able to divorce abusive alcoholic husbands (the nerve).

    Learn about Lucy Stone: Abolitionist and Women's Rights Reformer

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