More ideas from Jan
“Transition” gowns. They occupy a short period between the late 15th century Burgundian gowns with the deep V necks and wide belt, and the incoming 16th century Tudor fashions. Back of gown – appears to have gores for fullness – no waist seam or pleating at the waist like later versions. Worn here with Beggins (headress). Detail from a version of Roman de la Rose, Bodleian Library, MS Douce 195 pg 18 by Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meung, French, late  15th century.

For quite a while, I’ve been contemplating “transition” gowns. They occupy a short period between the late century Burgundian gowns with the deep V necks and wide belt, and…

The 'everyday dress' is of a wool/linen weave in a white and green diamond pattern, probably from around 1550. Great site, 3 extant gowns and details of construction.

Cockatrice: Extant Dresses in Pisa: Updates on sewing and construction techniques from the Costume Colloquium Florence. The 'everyday dress' is of a wool/linen weave in a white and green diamond pattern, probably from around

Purses on deposit in Kunsthistorische museum, Vienna (16th century)

Purses on deposit in Kunsthistorische museum, Vienna century) Need updated colour photos