Pair of Winged Horses, Kazakhstan, 5th – 4th century BC, stamped gold, 4 x 6 7/8″, Collection, Museum of Gold and Precious Metals, Astana, Kazakhstan

Pair of Winged Horses, Kazakhstan, 5th – 4th century BC, stamped gold, 4 x 6 7/8″, Collection, Museum of Gold and Precious Metals, Astana, Kazakhstan

Plaques in the form of paired figures of deer and birds. - The history of Kazakhstan - Pictures - Gallery - Educational Site in Kazakhstan

Plaques in the form of paired figures of deer and birds. - The history of Kazakhstan - Pictures - Gallery - Educational Site in Kazakhstan

"Buddhist scribes". Monastery of Karashahr,  China. The Kingdom of Yanqi (Karashar) was an ancient Buddhist kingdom located on the branch of the Silk Route that ran along the northern edge of the Taklamakan Desert in the Tarim Basin. According to Hanshu, the various states of the Western Regions, including Yanqi, were controlled by the Xiongnu, but later came under the influence of the Han Dynasty after its show of force when it attacked Dayuan (Fergana) late 2nd century BC.

"Buddhist scribes". Monastery of Karashahr, China. The Kingdom of Yanqi (Karashar) was an ancient Buddhist kingdom located on the branch of the Silk Route that ran along the northern edge of the Taklamakan Desert in the Tarim Basin. According to Hanshu, the various states of the Western Regions, including Yanqi, were controlled by the Xiongnu, but later came under the influence of the Han Dynasty after its show of force when it attacked Dayuan (Fergana) late 2nd century BC.

Huns - Xiōngnú is the modern Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, while it is pronounced as Hung-no in modern Cantonese. It was pronounced /xuawŋ-nɔ/ in Early Middle Chinese.[19] Apart from the similarity of the names, evidence includes the transmission of grip laths for composite bows from Central Asia to the west[20] and the similarity of Xiongnu and Hunnic cauldrons, which were buried on river banks both in Hungary and in the Ordos.[

Huns - Xiōngnú is the modern Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, while it is pronounced as Hung-no in modern Cantonese. It was pronounced /xuawŋ-nɔ/ in Early Middle Chinese.[19] Apart from the similarity of the names, evidence includes the transmission of grip laths for composite bows from Central Asia to the west[20] and the similarity of Xiongnu and Hunnic cauldrons, which were buried on river banks both in Hungary and in the Ordos.[

Casting Model for Belt Plaque Date: 2nd–1st century B.C.  Culture: North China-Xiongnu Medium: Clay Dimensions: L. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm)  Classification: Ceramics The Metropolitan Museum Of Art/New York.

Casting Model for Belt Plaque Date: 2nd–1st century B.C. Culture: North China-Xiongnu Medium: Clay Dimensions: L. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm) Classification: Ceramics The Metropolitan Museum Of Art/New York.

A rare bronze plate armour found at Inner Mongolia, either belonged to the Mongols or ancient Xiongnu.

A rare bronze plate armour found at Inner Mongolia, either belonged to the Mongols or ancient Xiongnu.

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