Frank Hurley The Endurance crushed between the floes. A week after the ship had been forced out of the ice came the final blow, the pressure crushed the ship into a mass of broken timber fragments, and the Endurance sank on October 25, 1915.

Frank Hurley The Endurance crushed between the floes. A week after the ship had been forced out of the ice came the final blow, the pressure crushed the ship into a mass of broken timber fragments, and the Endurance sank on October 25, 1915.

The Shackleton expedition's ship The Endurance breaks apart after months trapped in the Antarctic ice. Shackleton and his men now must camp on the ice floe, careful that the ice does not crack and the killer whales do not rise to the surface and tip them into the freezing waters.

Leadership Lessons From Ernest Shakleton

The Shackleton expedition's ship The Endurance breaks apart after months trapped in the Antarctic ice. Shackleton and his men now must camp on the ice floe, careful that the ice does not crack and the killer whales do not rise to the surface and tip them into the freezing waters.

Ernest Shackleton Ad Poster, listing men for the 1914 trans-Antarctic expedition

Ernest Shackleton Ad Poster, listing men for the 1914 trans-Antarctic expedition

Frank Hurley - The 'Endurance' crushed between the floes. A week after the ship had been forced out of the ice came the final blow, the pressure crushed the ship into a mass of broken timber fragments, and the Endurance sank on October 25, 1915.

Frank Hurley - The 'Endurance' crushed between the floes. A week after the ship had been forced out of the ice came the final blow, the pressure crushed the ship into a mass of broken timber fragments, and the Endurance sank on October 25, 1915.

Frank Hurleys photograph of Sir Ernest Shackleton and his five-man crew, setting off on an epic journey of 800-miles (1,500km) across the Southern Ocean in an open boat, is one of the enduring images of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. This photograph was taken on 24 April 1916

Frank Hurleys photograph of Sir Ernest Shackleton and his five-man crew, setting off on an epic journey of 800-miles (1,500km) across the Southern Ocean in an open boat, is one of the enduring images of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. This photograph was taken on 24 April 1916

For the past 100 years, a box of never-before-seen negatives has been preserved in a block of ice in Antarctica. The negatives are believed to be from Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1917 Ross Sea Party, a group that was stranded in the hut during a blizzard when their ship blew out to sea. They were eventually rescued, but the box remained buried until now.

For the past 100 years, a box of never-before-seen negatives has been preserved in a block of ice in Antarctica. The negatives are believed to be from Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1917 Ross Sea Party, a group that was stranded in the hut during a blizzard when their ship blew out to sea. They were eventually rescued, but the box remained buried until now.

October 19, 1915 This photograph shows Shackleton leaning over the ship. At this point, Shackleton realized the end of the ship was near. The photograph is entitled "The beginning of the end" A week later they abandonded ship.

October 19, 1915 This photograph shows Shackleton leaning over the ship. At this point, Shackleton realized the end of the ship was near. The photograph is entitled "The beginning of the end" A week later they abandonded ship.

Taking the dogs out for exercise, Aug. 1915. Photograph of seven members of the party taking dogs down a gang plank from Endurance onto the ice. Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) stands on the side of the ship looking down.

Taking the dogs out for exercise, Aug. 1915. Photograph of seven members of the party taking dogs down a gang plank from Endurance onto the ice. Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) stands on the side of the ship looking down.

Sled rounding the point of the Barne Glacier during the British Antarctic (“Terra Nova”) Expedition September 1911.

Sled rounding the point of the Barne Glacier during the British Antarctic (“Terra Nova”) Expedition September 1911.

Map of the routes of the ships Endurance and Aurora, the support team route, and the planned trans-Antarctic route of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Ernest Shackleton in 1914–15.

Map of the routes of the ships Endurance and Aurora, the support team route, and the planned trans-Antarctic route of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Ernest Shackleton in 1914–15.

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