Shibori detail

Japanese tie-dyeing is called shibori. In this dyeing method, light-weight silk is manipulated to create areas that resist the dyes. A variety of effects are achieved by stitching, folding, clamping, pole wrapping or binding the cloth before dyeing. Most often the different areas are patterned by tightly wrapping tiny sections of the white silk with thread. When the fabric is dyed, the wrapped areas remain un-dyed. This simple technique is very labor-intensive and requires great dexterity
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Shibori summer kimono. Taisho to very early Showa (1912-1930), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. A sheer ro hitoe kimono with all motifs constructed utilizing the shibori (tie-dye) technique. Our assessment is that the variations in color in the shibori - for example some yellowish areas - are intentional and are attributes to the total aesthetic. The shibori work on this kimono is exceptionally intricate, and must have been accomplished by a gifted craftsman.

Taisho to very early Showa period Japan. The Kimono Gallery A sheer ro hitoe kimono with all motifs constructed utilizing the shibori (tie-dye) technique.

Ra Hitoe Kimono.  Early-Showa period (1927-1940), Japan.  A sheer semi-transparent ra unlined silk kimono featuring shibori (tie-dye) stylized fan motifs. The Kimono Gallery.

A sheer semi-transparent ra unlined silk kimono featuring shibori (tie-dye) stylized fan motifs. The Kimono Gallery.

Shibori Furisode. Late 20th century, Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. A large silk furisode featuring peony, wisteria and hydrangea motifs created utilizing a combination of weaving and shibori (tie-dye).

The Kimono Gallery. A large silk furisode featuring peony, wisteria and hydrangea motifs created utilizing a combination of weaving and shibori (tie-dye).

Edo Dounuki. Late Edo period (1800-1867), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. A very fine silk inner kimono featuring refined shibori patterning as well as katazome faux-shibori.

The Kimono Gallery. A very fine silk inner kimono featuring refined shibori patterning as well as katazome faux-shibori. The dounuki is a specific.

Shibori Kimono.  Early Showa period (1927-1940), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery.  A rinzu silk kimono featuring ‘chayatsuji’ (water garden scenery) with 'ume’(Japanese plum), 'kaede’ (maple leaf) and 'shippou-tsunagi’ (jointed four circles) patterns. Shibori is the main technique utilized, with the addition of yuzen-dyeing (painting) and plentiful foil highlighting. The soft, high-quality rinzu (damask) silk base is woven with motifs of wave, bird and flower circle patterns.

The Kimono Gallery. A rinzu silk kimono featuring ‘chayatsuji’ (water garden scenery) with 'ume’(Japanese plum), 'kaede’ (maple leaf) and.

Shibori Summer Kimono. Early Showa period (1927-1940), Japan. The Kimono Gallery.  A rayon sheer Ro hitoe summer kimono featuring shibori-created yabane (arrow feather) motifs with ‘tatewaku’ (wavy lines). Sparse vertical metallic thread inserts.

The Kimono Gallery. A rayon sheer Ro hitoe summer kimono featuring shibori-created yabane (arrow feather) motifs with ‘tatewaku’ (wavy lines).

Shibori by the late Motohiko Katano | via Yoshido Wada on Flickr

After coming across this book of Shibori techniques by Motohiko Katano I really started to realise the value of Indigo. Katano spent a lifetime dedicated to shibori and you can see the value of pur…

Summer Shibori Kimono. Taisho to very early Showa period (1912-1930), Japan. The Kimono Gallery A sheer ro hitoe kimono with all motifs constructed utilizing the shibori (tie-dye) technique.

Taisho to very early Showa period Japan. The Kimono Gallery A sheer ro hitoe kimono with all motifs constructed utilizing the shibori (tie-dye) technique.

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