Plush Pony Al: Like many Wells Fargo wagon drivers, W.A. Zweifel became attached to his faithful horse, Al. Zweifel and Al worked in Denver, Colorado, where they delivered Wells Fargo express packages to area customers. When Zweifel learned Al was to be sold, he worried that the horse wouldn’t receive the same quality care that Wells Fargo provided. Zweifel purchased Al himself and retired his old friend to the family ranch. Al lived out his days in peace and quiet.

Plush Pony Al: Like many Wells Fargo wagon drivers, W.A. Zweifel became attached to his faithful horse, Al. Zweifel and Al worked in Denver, Colorado, where they delivered Wells Fargo express packages to area customers. When Zweifel learned Al was to be sold, he worried that the horse wouldn’t receive the same quality care that Wells Fargo provided. Zweifel purchased Al himself and retired his old friend to the family ranch. Al lived out his days in peace and quiet.

In 1897, Rush Blodget started working for Wells Fargo as a wagon driver in Bakersfield, California. He worked with Nellie up until he left for college, carrying as much as $20,000 in coins in the back of their wagon. Nellie was famous around town for her calm, slow pace, but on one occasion in 1989, she understood the urgency to pick up her trot to a lively pace to help a sick soldier who happened to be Rush’s brother to his home to seek medical attention.

In 1897, Rush Blodget started working for Wells Fargo as a wagon driver in Bakersfield, California. He worked with Nellie up until he left for college, carrying as much as $20,000 in coins in the back of their wagon. Nellie was famous around town for her calm, slow pace, but on one occasion in 1989, she understood the urgency to pick up her trot to a lively pace to help a sick soldier who happened to be Rush’s brother to his home to seek medical attention.

Plush Pony Trixie: Trixie was born and raised in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. She started working for Wells Fargo in 1918, pulling the wagon that picked up and delivered Wells Fargo Express packages in her hometown. Trixie’s driver carried an iron hitch weight in the wagon, to keep her safely tethered at the curb while he attended to customers’ business. A wool blanket kept Trixie warm in the winter.

Plush Pony Trixie: Trixie was born and raised in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. She started working for Wells Fargo in 1918, pulling the wagon that picked up and delivered Wells Fargo Express packages in her hometown. Trixie’s driver carried an iron hitch weight in the wagon, to keep her safely tethered at the curb while he attended to customers’ business. A wool blanket kept Trixie warm in the winter.

Plush Pony Trixie: Trixie was born and raised in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. She started working for Wells Fargo in 1918, pulling the wagon that picked up and delivered Wells Fargo Express packages in her hometown. Trixie’s driver carried an iron hitch weight in the wagon, to keep her safely tethered at the curb while he attended to customers’ business. A wool blanket kept Trixie warm in the winter.

Plush Pony Trixie: Trixie was born and raised in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. She started working for Wells Fargo in 1918, pulling the wagon that picked up and delivered Wells Fargo Express packages in her hometown. Trixie’s driver carried an iron hitch weight in the wagon, to keep her safely tethered at the curb while he attended to customers’ business. A wool blanket kept Trixie warm in the winter.

In 1909, a beautiful mare named Maggie represented Wells Fargo in the first annual San Francisco Work Horse Parade. @sfspca organized the Parade to demonstrate that responsible treatment of animals paid dividends for businesses that depended upon them. At age 25, Maggie had worked for Wells Fargo for over 20 years. For the Work Horse Parade, Maggie was entered into the “old horse” class, along with another Wells Fargo horse, Menlo. “Old class” or not, Maggie was as strong as any younger…

In 1909, a beautiful mare named Maggie represented Wells Fargo in the first annual San Francisco Work Horse Parade. @sfspca organized the Parade to demonstrate that responsible treatment of animals paid dividends for businesses that depended upon them. At age 25, Maggie had worked for Wells Fargo for over 20 years. For the Work Horse Parade, Maggie was entered into the “old horse” class, along with another Wells Fargo horse, Menlo. “Old class” or not, Maggie was as strong as any younger…

Plush Pony Billy: Wells Fargo wagons, pulled by trusty steeds like Billy, were a familiar sight on Main Streets all across America. Billy performed heavy-duty work, but was also one of the first media stars — he was featured in the February 1914 issue of Wells Fargo Messenger.

Plush Pony Billy: Wells Fargo wagons, pulled by trusty steeds like Billy, were a familiar sight on Main Streets all across America. Billy performed heavy-duty work, but was also one of the first media stars — he was featured in the February 1914 issue of Wells Fargo Messenger.

Plush Pony Prince: In 1901, a handsome horse named Prince arrived at Wells Fargo’s stable in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. He had cost $125—a “Princely” sum!—because he was the most handsome horse of them all. Prince always looked smart pulling the Wells Fargo wagon around downtown Ardmore. In 1913, Wells Fargo Messenger, the company magazine, reminded drivers: “Our horses, wagons and harness are the pride of Wells Fargo service—our best advertisement.”

Plush Pony Prince: In 1901, a handsome horse named Prince arrived at Wells Fargo’s stable in Ardmore, Oklahoma Territory. He had cost $125—a “Princely” sum!—because he was the most handsome horse of them all. Prince always looked smart pulling the Wells Fargo wagon around downtown Ardmore. In 1913, Wells Fargo Messenger, the company magazine, reminded drivers: “Our horses, wagons and harness are the pride of Wells Fargo service—our best advertisement.”

Plush Pony Buck: A handsome Palomino, Buck went to work for Wells Fargo in 1900, in Ardmore Oklahoma Territory. At 15 hands he wasn’t the largest horse in the stable. But he could pull a fully-loaded express wagon all by himself, or as part of a two-horse team hauling a big double wagon.

Plush Pony Buck: A handsome Palomino, Buck went to work for Wells Fargo in 1900, in Ardmore Oklahoma Territory. At 15 hands he wasn’t the largest horse in the stable. But he could pull a fully-loaded express wagon all by himself, or as part of a two-horse team hauling a big double wagon.

Plush Pony Grace: Grace was one of the last ponies to ever work for Wells Fargo Express. She and her workmate, Ben, pulled a Wells Fargo wagon in Los Angeles in 1916, a time of transition from horse-drawn wagons to motor trucks. While Los Angeles became a mecca for horseless vehicles, Grace and Ben kept on the job, and delivered the goods with dignity.

Plush Pony Grace: Grace was one of the last ponies to ever work for Wells Fargo Express. She and her workmate, Ben, pulled a Wells Fargo wagon in Los Angeles in 1916, a time of transition from horse-drawn wagons to motor trucks. While Los Angeles became a mecca for horseless vehicles, Grace and Ben kept on the job, and delivered the goods with dignity.

Plush Pony Mollie was a striking white mare stagecoach horse from Roseburg, Oregon. She led the team on many journeys, but she most famously led the stagecoach that brought President Rutherford B. Hayes to Roseburg in 1880. On that presidential trip, Hayes narrowly missed encountering the notorious bandit Black Bart, who had robbed the same stage three days earlier. Had Black Bart’s schedule been just a little different, imagine his surprise to find the President of the United States aboard.

Plush Pony Mollie was a striking white mare stagecoach horse from Roseburg, Oregon. She led the team on many journeys, but she most famously led the stagecoach that brought President Rutherford B. Hayes to Roseburg in 1880. On that presidential trip, Hayes narrowly missed encountering the notorious bandit Black Bart, who had robbed the same stage three days earlier. Had Black Bart’s schedule been just a little different, imagine his surprise to find the President of the United States aboard.


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Plush Pony Al: Like many Wells Fargo wagon drivers, W.A. Zweifel became attached to his faithful horse, Al. Zweifel and Al worked in Denver, Colorado, where they delivered Wells Fargo express packages to area customers. When Zweifel learned Al was to be sold, he worried that the horse wouldn’t receive the same quality care that Wells Fargo provided. Zweifel purchased Al himself and retired his old friend to the family ranch. Al lived out his days in peace and quiet.

Plush Pony Al: Like many Wells Fargo wagon drivers, W.A. Zweifel became attached to his faithful horse, Al. Zweifel and Al worked in Denver, Colorado, where they delivered Wells Fargo express packages to area customers. When Zweifel learned Al was to be sold, he worried that the horse wouldn’t receive the same quality care that Wells Fargo provided. Zweifel purchased Al himself and retired his old friend to the family ranch. Al lived out his days in peace and quiet.

Wells Fargo wagons were common on dry land, but you could also see one on water. Snowflake lived in Jersey City, New Jersey where the Erie Railroad ended. Her daily routine began with hitching up and boarding the ferry to New York City. There, she led a team of horses that delivered money and important packages to @nycgov. Illustrator Edward Hopper depicted a Wells Fargo wagon, led by a white horse, aboard a ferry for the March 1917 cover of Wells Fargo Messenger, the company’s monthly…

Wells Fargo wagons were common on dry land, but you could also see one on water. Snowflake lived in Jersey City, New Jersey where the Erie Railroad ended. Her daily routine began with hitching up and boarding the ferry to New York City. There, she led a team of horses that delivered money and important packages to @nycgov. Illustrator Edward Hopper depicted a Wells Fargo wagon, led by a white horse, aboard a ferry for the March 1917 cover of Wells Fargo Messenger, the company’s monthly…

“Pony Express.” The words evoke a picture of a lone rider and horse, racing across a forbidding western landscape. Pony Express riders and horses crossed 1,966 miles between Missouri and California in ten days. Lightning and 18-year-old Richard “Ras” Egan carried the first mail west from Salt Lake City in the pockets of a mochilla, a leather saddlebag. Lightning earned her name that day, making the 22-mile trip between relay stations in only 65 minutes!

“Pony Express.” The words evoke a picture of a lone rider and horse, racing across a forbidding western landscape. Pony Express riders and horses crossed 1,966 miles between Missouri and California in ten days. Lightning and 18-year-old Richard “Ras” Egan carried the first mail west from Salt Lake City in the pockets of a mochilla, a leather saddlebag. Lightning earned her name that day, making the 22-mile trip between relay stations in only 65 minutes!

Mack helped pull a stagecoach from Placerville, California, to Carson City, Nevada. He and 600 other horses pulled eight stages daily for the Pioneer Line, which Wells Fargo acquired in 1864. In 1865 J. Ross Browne was a passenger on a stagecoach ride to Nevada’s silver mines. He was impressed by the way Charlie, an experienced driver, encouraged his six-horse team along the steep, dusty road and the downhill run. Browne observed that “Charlie loved his horses with a kind of paternal…

Mack helped pull a stagecoach from Placerville, California, to Carson City, Nevada. He and 600 other horses pulled eight stages daily for the Pioneer Line, which Wells Fargo acquired in 1864. In 1865 J. Ross Browne was a passenger on a stagecoach ride to Nevada’s silver mines. He was impressed by the way Charlie, an experienced driver, encouraged his six-horse team along the steep, dusty road and the downhill run. Browne observed that “Charlie loved his horses with a kind of paternal…

Plush Pony El Toro: In Spanish, El Toro means “the bull,” but this legendary Wells Fargo pony was a favorite horse of Wells Fargo agents in Mexico.  In 1913, El Toro was over 27 years of age and the oldest express horse working in Mexico City, one of 750 locations served by Wells Fargo south of the border. El Toro kept limber by delivering customer packages just a few hours a week.

Plush Pony El Toro: In Spanish, El Toro means “the bull,” but this legendary Wells Fargo pony was a favorite horse of Wells Fargo agents in Mexico. In 1913, El Toro was over 27 years of age and the oldest express horse working in Mexico City, one of 750 locations served by Wells Fargo south of the border. El Toro kept limber by delivering customer packages just a few hours a week.

In 1897, Rush Blodget started working for Wells Fargo as a wagon driver in Bakersfield, California. He worked with Nellie up until he left for college, carrying as much as $20,000 in coins in the back of their wagon. Nellie was famous around town for her calm, slow pace, but on one occasion in 1989, she understood the urgency to pick up her trot to a lively pace to help a sick soldier who happened to be Rush’s brother to his home to seek medical attention.

In 1897, Rush Blodget started working for Wells Fargo as a wagon driver in Bakersfield, California. He worked with Nellie up until he left for college, carrying as much as $20,000 in coins in the back of their wagon. Nellie was famous around town for her calm, slow pace, but on one occasion in 1989, she understood the urgency to pick up her trot to a lively pace to help a sick soldier who happened to be Rush’s brother to his home to seek medical attention.

Champion stallion Shamrock was the pride of the Wells Fargo wagon teams in St. Louis, Missouri. Every morning at the Union Depot, dozens of Wells Fargo wagons and horses picked up express from all over the country. Wells Fargo driver Ollie Ziegler described the scene: "When prancing, slow trotting just a bit faster than a walk, their necks bowed, champing at the bits, carrying their tails high, the drivers’ arms outstretched and holding a tight line, all made a never to be forgotten sight."

Champion stallion Shamrock was the pride of the Wells Fargo wagon teams in St. Louis, Missouri. Every morning at the Union Depot, dozens of Wells Fargo wagons and horses picked up express from all over the country. Wells Fargo driver Ollie Ziegler described the scene: "When prancing, slow trotting just a bit faster than a walk, their necks bowed, champing at the bits, carrying their tails high, the drivers’ arms outstretched and holding a tight line, all made a never to be forgotten sight."

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