John Fotiadis - “The Solace Of Antiquity”

Collection by John Fotiadis • Last updated 10 days ago

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An ongoing project by John Fotiadis based on drawings made in Athens and Sounion, Greece in July 2019, as well as related drawings afterwards. Classical antiquity is omnipresent in Greece, woven into the cultural legacy of the country physically, psychologically and intellectually. It is an immense, epic, unavoidable, and at times, mysterious presence, mostly manifest through its architecture. Through drawing this project explores the themes of omnipresence, permanence/impermanence, and solace.

John Fotiadis
This is a copy of a drawing of a cast of “Zeus of Otricoli”. A statue found in Otricoli in 1775 during the excavation financed by Pope Pius VI. It is on display in the Sala Rotonda of the Pio-Clementine Vatican Museum

A drawing study after a 19th C. Academic drawing of the “Otricoli Zeus”.

This is a copy of a drawing of a cast of “Zeus of Otricoli”. A statue found in Otricoli in 1775 during the excavation financed by Pope Pius VI. It is on display in the Sala Rotonda of the Pio-Clementine Vatican Museum

Based on field sketches and photos taken, July 2019.

The Northeast corner of the Parthenon, Acropolis Athens, Greece

Based on field sketches and photos taken, July 2019.

A finished and digitally enhanced drawing from my "Solace of Antiquity" Series. Full size image 13"X 19" now available for purchase.  © 2019-2020 John Fotiadis

The South Facade of the Temple of Poseidon

A finished and digitally enhanced drawing from my "Solace of Antiquity" Series. Full size image 13"X 19" now available for purchase. © 2019-2020 John Fotiadis

Taken from field photos in July, 2019.

Oblique view of the west porch The Temple of Hephaestus, Agora, Athens, Greece

Taken from field photos in July, 2019.

The first study of this magnificent structure. Looking through the west porch towards the rear cella wall which now has a doorway in it, which as a result now shows the columns of the pronaos and the Agora beyond.

The Temple of Hephaestus (AKA "Thesion"), Athens 1st study.

The first study of this magnificent structure. Looking through the west porch towards the rear cella wall which now has a doorway in it, which as a result now shows the columns of the pronaos and the Agora beyond.

Graphite on paper. The first “proper” drawing of this series. Based on field sketches and photos taken.

The South facade of the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, Greece

Graphite on paper. The first “proper” drawing of this series. Based on field sketches and photos taken.

A more elaborate drawing developed from a sketch done on site and some photos.

Columns at the Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. Greece

A more elaborate drawing developed from a sketch done on site and some photos.

My new finished drawing of the circular courtyard of the #Zappeion in #Athens #Greece. Black and white charcoal on gray tone paper. Built in 1874 on 80,000 square metres of public land between the Palace Gardens and the ancient Temple of Olympian Zeus, the building was part of the works related to the first modern Olympic Games which occurred in 1896. Today it serves as a pavilion for exhibits and a conference center. The building was designed by Danish architect Theophil Hansen.

The Courtyard of the Zappeion

My new finished drawing of the circular courtyard of the #Zappeion in #Athens #Greece. Black and white charcoal on gray tone paper. Built in 1874 on 80,000 square metres of public land between the Palace Gardens and the ancient Temple of Olympian Zeus, the building was part of the works related to the first modern Olympic Games which occurred in 1896. Today it serves as a pavilion for exhibits and a conference center. The building was designed by Danish architect Theophil Hansen.

Memorializing a very hot July afternoon in 2019, when I spent the better part of a day sketching, photographing, and walking the site. Facing West-Southwest with the majestic Mt. Hymettus in the distance. Construction of this extraordinary building began in the 6th century BC, but it was not completed until the reign of the the great Philhellene Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, some 638 years after the project had begun.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens

Memorializing a very hot July afternoon in 2019, when I spent the better part of a day sketching, photographing, and walking the site. Facing West-Southwest with the majestic Mt. Hymettus in the distance. Construction of this extraordinary building began in the 6th century BC, but it was not completed until the reign of the the great Philhellene Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, some 638 years after the project had begun.

Located in #Athens #Greece. This landmark is a ceremonial gate still standing in the city center today built c. 130 AD to honor the emperor’s arrival and express thanks for his benefactions to the city.

The Arch of Hadrian

Located in #Athens #Greece. This landmark is a ceremonial gate still standing in the city center today built c. 130 AD to honor the emperor’s arrival and express thanks for his benefactions to the city.

‪A finished #drawing of The Temple of Hephaestus in the #Agora of #Athens #Greece. This view looks into the west Porch towards the rear Cella wall which has a doorway in it (added later), which in turn reveals the columns of the Pronaos and the Agora beyond. ‬ The doorway which connects the rear porch or 'opisthodomos' with the cella on the other side, did not exist in antiquity but was probably added when the building was converted into a church.

The Temple of Hephaestus in the Agora, Athens, Greece.

‪A finished #drawing of The Temple of Hephaestus in the #Agora of #Athens #Greece. This view looks into the west Porch towards the rear Cella wall which has a doorway in it (added later), which in turn reveals the columns of the Pronaos and the Agora beyond. ‬ The doorway which connects the rear porch or 'opisthodomos' with the cella on the other side, did not exist in antiquity but was probably added when the building was converted into a church.

A statue of Herodotus that I tripped upon (quite by accident) in the Stoa of Attalos in the ancient Agora in Athens, Greece. I'd been reading "The Histories" all winter and had no idea this statue was there. Happened to exit the building by this column and suddenly I was looking at him eye to eye. From a photo I took.

“The Father of History” - A bust of Herodotus in the Stoa of Attalos, Agora, Athens

A statue of Herodotus that I tripped upon (quite by accident) in the Stoa of Attalos in the ancient Agora in Athens, Greece. I'd been reading "The Histories" all winter and had no idea this statue was there. Happened to exit the building by this column and suddenly I was looking at him eye to eye. From a photo I took.

An unfinished first study.

Temple of Poseidon, Cape Sounion. Facing west from the south facade

An unfinished first study.

An architectural ornamental element - this one from the top of a grave stele from the #RomanAgora in #Athens #Greece. Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper.

Anthemion from the Roman Agora

An architectural ornamental element - this one from the top of a grave stele from the #RomanAgora in #Athens #Greece. Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper.

A initial color study. The south colonnade of the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, Attiki, Greece. Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper

Columns at the Temple of Poseidon, Sounion.

A initial color study. The south colonnade of the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, Attiki, Greece. Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper

View of Lycabettus Hill from The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens ,Greece. Colored Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper. A major landmark at 300 meters (908 feet) above sea level, and visible from almost anywhere in the city, Lycabettus summit is the highest point in Athens.

Lycabettus Hill between the Columns of The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens

View of Lycabettus Hill from The Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens ,Greece. Colored Prismacolor pencil on gray tone paper. A major landmark at 300 meters (908 feet) above sea level, and visible from almost anywhere in the city, Lycabettus summit is the highest point in Athens.