There’s more to see...
Sign up to discover and save different things to try in 2015.

dust storms


dust storms

  • 25 Pins

Arizona Dust Storms followed by Thunderstorms

A heartbreaking photograph from the 1930s dust storms

The Dust Bowl;period of severe dust storms causing major eco damage to American prairie in the 1930s.Caused by drought coupled w/decades of farming w/o crop rotation or cover crops to prevent erosion.100s of thousands were forced to leave their homes;known as 'Okies',since so many came from Oklahoma to California & other states where they found economic conditions little better than those they had left.Many became migrant workers who traveled to pick crops@starvation wages.

About to be engulfed in a gigantic dust cloud is a peaceful little ranch in Boise City, Oklahoma where the topsoil is being dried and blown away during the years of the Dust Bowl in central North America. Severe drought, poor farming techniques and devastating storms rendered millions of acres of farmland useless. This photo was taken on April 15, 1935.

Gigantic dust cloud in Boise City, Oklahoma. Severe drought, poor farming techniques and devastating storms rendered millions of acres of farmland useless. This photo was taken on April 15, 1935.

The Dust Bowl dust storm approaches Stratford, Texas, in 1935 The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought coupled with decades of extensive farming without crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops or other techniques to prevent wind erosion.

The Dust Bowl dust storm approaches Stratford, Texas, in 1935 The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought coupled with decades of extensive farming without crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops or other techniques to prevent wind erosion.

An artist's concept of a Martian dust storm, showing how electrical charge builds up as in terrestrial thunderstorms. Though on Earth, lightning is common, there is no evidence that lightning accompanies storms on Mars. (Photo: NASA)

Dust storms, or ‘haboobs’ as they are commonly known, often cause widespread destruction and inconvenience when they strike. Usually reserved for places with large amounts of dust and sand, such as the Arabian Peninsula and the Sahara Desert

This undated photograph captures a large dust storm about to hit this family's homestead. These storms were frequent occurrences in western Kansas during the 1930s Dust Bowl. Date: Around 1935

History 'Black Blizzard' on Oct. 12, 1934 massive dust storms of the 30's. holy moly!

Dust Bowl. Agricultural practices combined with drought to cause these horrible dust storms

summer monsoons & dust storms

Modern dust storms. How similar are they to the Dust Bowl storms?

If I don't believe in the dust storms, are there dust storms?

Concept art of dust storms & dust devils on Mars

Ahhh Phoenix dust storms...

Dust storms in Oklahoma (1937)

Goodwell, Oklahoma, June 4, 1937

There were three major dust storms during the Dust Bowl: November 11th, 1933, in South Dakota; May 9th, 1934, along the Great Plains; and the "Black Blizzard" of April 14th, 1935. In the winter of 1935-36, red snow fell on New England.

Dorothea Lange June, 1938 Library of Congress description: "Coldwater District, north of Dalhart, Texas. This house is occupied; most of the houses in this district have been abandoned."

Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein. The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.

Goodwell, Oklahoma, June 4, 1937

Dorothea Lange June, 1938 Library of Congress description: "Coldwater District, north of Dalhart, Texas. This house is occupied; most of the houses in this district have been abandoned."

“Dust Over Texas.” Huge boiling masses of dust that blocked out the sun were common sights in Texas during the Dust Bowl years. In: “To Hold This Soil”, Russell Lord, 1938. Miscellaneous Publication No. 321, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Circa 1935