Native Americans

Celebrating all native Americans.
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Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte (1865-1915)   Dr. Picotte was the first American Indian woman in the United States to receive a medical degree, graduating at the top of her class at the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1889. After her internship, she returned to the Omaha Reservation in Nebraska to care for more than 1,200 of her own native people at the government boarding school. She opened a hospital in the reservation town of Walthill, Nebraska in 1913, two years before her death.

Susan LaFlesche Picotte was the first American Indian woman in the U. to receive a medical degree, graduating at the top of her class at the Woman's Medical College of PA in 1889

Cherokee Indian Tribe | American Indian's History: Cherokee Legends of White Indians and ...

Arrowmaker, an Ojibwa brave, by the Detroit Photographic Co, Vintage photo restored by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

Native American bride headdress

Hummingbird (Huitzitzilín in her native Nahuatl) Aztec princess to slave and concubine, recounts her life during the Spanish conquest of Mexico.

Will Sampson ~ A Native American actor of the Creek Nation, Sampson's "big break" came from his memorable role in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest opposite Jack Nicholson. He was also starred opposite Clint Eastwood in the western The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Will Sampson ~ Native American actor of the Creek Nation, Sampson's "big break" came from memorable role in 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' opposite Jack Nicholson. Also starred opposite Clint Eastwood in 'The Outlaw Josey Wales'

Spotted Jack Rabbit, Apsaroke, 1908

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian - volume 4 facing: page 108 Spotted Jack-Rabbit - Apsaroke

Jay Tavare- Actor/writer

Jay Tavare- Actor/writer totally works for me as Manteo in BREAKING TIES (first book in the Lost Colony Series)

Kiowa man Sitting-in-the-Saddle, who is Lone Wolf's son. Photographed between 1869 and 1874.

Lone Wolf's son, Sitting-in-the-Saddle (Tau-ankia, Tibone), a Native American (Kiowa) man

"The sacred pipe of the Native Americans is a potent symbol of relationship. Through it the human breath sends to all the six directions the purifying smoke that connects the person to the divine and is the link between all forms of life: "mitakuye oyasin," we are all relatives."  ―Joseph Epes Brown, "The Pipe of Reconciliation" from our Winter 1989 Issue: http://bit.ly/1pKh5M0  Read the essay here: http://bit.ly/1pKh8aK  Photography Credit: Edward S. Curtis

Cherokee man smoking a Pipe. (European word "peace pipe",) not so with many Nations, Tribes, Confederacy. Pipe was smoked in "peace" process as a token of "binding or good. Much miss-used term "peace pipe"

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