Read Alouds 2012

These are the books I've read to the kids the year Jack is 8 and Jane is 5. Books marked with * are books we either own or that are on my ever-lengthening list of books to buy.
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The kids are enamored with this boy Dickens whose early life is so difficult and who grows up to be the author of a book they love ("A Christmas Carol," which we read in December.)

The kids are enamored with this boy Dickens whose early life is so difficult and who grows up to be the author of a book they love ("A Christmas Carol," which we read in December.)

HANSEL AND GRETEL by Cynthia Rylant, illus. by Jen Corace. Rylant's retelling of this fairy tale is lovely, and Corace's illustrations are a perfect complement.

Hansel and Gretel, Words by Cynthia Rylant, Pictures By Jen Corace

HANSEL AND GRETEL by Cynthia Rylant, illus. by Jen Corace. Rylant's retelling of this fairy tale is lovely, and Corace's illustrations are a perfect complement.

a collection of seriously nonsensical rhymes that my kids keep reading again and again, to the point that they've got several of their favorites memorized!

a collection of seriously nonsensical rhymes that my kids keep reading again and again, to the point that they've got several of their favorites memorized!

I love Patricia Polacco. This is an especially touching story.

I love Patricia Polacco. This is an especially touching story.

Beautiful poetry plus beautiful illustrations plus the words of the Beatitudes running along the bottom of each page equals a mama crying while she reads aloud of God's presence in the midst of injustice. A truly beautiful book.

Beautiful poetry plus beautiful illustrations plus the words of the Beatitudes running along the bottom of each page equals a mama crying while she reads aloud of God's presence in the midst of injustice. A truly beautiful book.

THE BOY WHO DREW CATS by Margaret Hodges, illus. by Aki Sogabe. Based on a legend about 15th century Japanese artist Seeshu Toyo, this story reminded me of THE HORSES OF HAN GAN: in that story, too, an artist's work is so realistic that it springs to life.

THE BOY WHO DREW CATS by Margaret Hodges, illus. by Aki Sogabe. Based on a legend about 15th century Japanese artist Seeshu Toyo, this story reminded me of THE HORSES OF HAN GAN: in that story, too, an artist's work is so realistic that it springs to life.

THE CRANE WIFE by Odds Bodkin, illus. by Gennady Spirin. A lovely (but sad) Japanese folktale. As always, Spirin's illustrations are gorgeous.

THE CRANE WIFE by Odds Bodkin, illus. by Gennady Spirin. A lovely (but sad) Japanese folktale. As always, Spirin's illustrations are gorgeous.

MY NAME IS ELIZABETH by Annika Dunklee, illus. by Matthew Forsythe. I can relate to Elizabeth who finds it frustrating that people are always shortening her name. (I once told an uncle I'd rather be called Booger than Kimmie.) Delightful orange-and-blue-toned retro illustrations capture Elizabeth's spunk.

MY NAME IS ELIZABETH by Annika Dunklee, illus. by Matthew Forsythe. I can relate to Elizabeth who finds it frustrating that people are always shortening her name. (I once told an uncle I'd rather be called Booger than Kimmie.) Delightful orange-and-blue-toned retro illustrations capture Elizabeth's spunk.

LITTLE OH by Laura Krauss Melmed, illus. by Jim LaMarche. This story of an origami girl who comes to life is magical and makes me smile, and the illustrations are gorgeous.

LITTLE OH by Laura Krauss Melmed, illus. by Jim LaMarche. This story of an origami girl who comes to life is magical and makes me smile, and the illustrations are gorgeous.

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