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KCPD Making History


KCPD Making History

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This was the original rendering of Police Headquarters, featured in the Kansas City Star in 1925. The building wasn't constructed until 13 years later, and if you've seen it, you know it turned out significantly different from this drawing. We'll be celebrating its rededication after extensive renovations this November.

This is Officer Carl Aufner Jr. and his canine partner, Fritz. They served together from 1972-82. Our follower Michelle (Aufner) Lawrence submitted this of her dad, and she said Fritz was one of her best friends growing up!

Great story from FOX 4 News Kansas City featuring the retired captain who started our Helicopter Unit in 1968. He stopped by yesterday to see how far things have progressed.

In honor of the Royals', here's a picture of KCPD's 1948 baseball team, provided by @StephanieMcBrayer! Her dad is Van Sowers.

Great story from FOX 4 News Kansas City featuring the retired captain who started our Helicopter Unit in 1968. He stopped by yesterday to see how far things have progressed.

Here is another picture submitted by one of our Facebook followers of his grandparents, Lewis and Sarah Spear, who both worked for KCPD. If you look closely at Lewis's badge, it says "Officer Friendly!"

Crosstown Sub-Station, KCPD History and KCP come together

Private Police Badge and Identification Card issued by Kansas City Missouri Police Department in 1934

Hat Shield and Badge issued by the Kansas City Police Department during the Home Rule era of 1932-1937

Police Badge worn by Women Officers of the Kansas City Missouri Police Department until 1980

Both front and back display of a Deputy Director's Badge given to F.H. Sepvantius, on May 2, 1937 by Otto P. Higgins (Director of Police) during the Home Rule era of the Kansas City Police Department

First Kansas City Police Detective Badge in about 1875

Kansas City Police Detective Badge issued in about 1901

First Kansas City Police Sergeant Badge issued in about 1870s

Badge worn by Kansas City Missouri Sanitation Police Officers in about 1883

16th Chief of Police Paul V. Woolley (January 1924 - April 1924)

15th Chief of Police Chester A. Vassar (January 1923 - December 1923)

14th Chief of Police Frank H. Anderson (August 1922 - January 1923)

From our 1986 Annual Report: a picture of the room where the ALERT criminal justice information system computers serving the whole KC Metro area were located. And a close-up of a computer chip. Because that was a big deal.

13th Chief Charles Edwards: (January 1921 - August 1922)

12th Chief of Police: Scott Godley (September 1918 - January 1921)

11th Chief of Police: Larry A. Ghent (June- September 1918)

10th Chief of Police: Thomas P. Flahive (May 1917 - June 1918)

Bandsmen: During the early 20th Century (circa 1910) the Kansas City Missouri Police Department was heavily involved in band and vocal music. For a short period of time policemen held commissioned rank and wore special uniforms with white hats, "BANDSMAN" stamped badges and patcehs (music harp and horns) designating their band involvement and status in the orchestra. The department held numerous concerts and marchind drills for the public and were wellknown to perform in parades and special even

  • Kansas City Missouri Police Department
    Kansas City Missouri Police Department

    In April of 1941 a barbershop quartet produced and sold a record album on the Decca Records label called "Bringin' Home the Bacon." Very vew examples of this badge exist, no doubt due to the waning lack of interest in this area of law enforecement, after the popularity of other recreational activities made the band concept less popular causing the badges, uniforms and associated equipment from that time period to become highly collectible items.

The 1125 Locust Police Headquarters Building, Nov. 19, 1938. Attracted over 25,000 visitors within the first month of its opening, It was built after many hours of study of all police station needs and under the direction of Director of Police, Otto P. Higgins. The cost of the building was approximately 1 million dollars and was financed under the "Ten-Year-Plan of Civic Improvements."