The Oarfish is a rare, solitary, and giant denizen of the ocean depths (arguably larger than a Whale Shark. (The Oarfish,17m as opposed to the Whale Shark, 12.96m in the Guinness Book of World Records.)) and is a filter feeder, comfortable cruising at depths of 200 m. Mistakenly named for its prominent pectoral oars with which it was thought to 'row', it undulates serpentlike with its dorsal fins and has been seen orienting itself vertically. This is one of rare photo. Thanks for pinning!

The Oarfish is a rare, solitary, and giant denizen of the ocean depths (arguably larger than a Whale Shark. (The Oarfish,17m as opposed to the Whale Shark, 12.96m in the Guinness Book of World Records.)) and is a filter feeder, comfortable cruising at depths of 200 m. Mistakenly named for its prominent pectoral oars with which it was thought to 'row', it undulates serpentlike with its dorsal fins and has been seen orienting itself vertically. This is one of rare photo. Thanks for pinning!

Breaching Humpback..By far one of the coolest things I have ever been able to see. Nothing like seeing this huge creature breach for what appears to be the pleasure of playing.

Breaching Humpback..By far one of the coolest things I have ever been able to see. Nothing like seeing this huge creature breach for what appears to be the pleasure of playing.

Most Bizarre Fish You’ve Ever Seen? A diver swims with a huge ocean sunfish, or Mola mola, off the coast of San Diego. They are the largest of the bony fish and often get mistaken for sharks due to their dorsal fins. They feed on jellyfish and plankton and are curious of humans, as seen in the photo. One threat to molas is drift nets, which they often get caught in, and garbage such as plastic bags that they mistake for jellyfish, their favorite food.

Most Bizarre Fish You’ve Ever Seen? A diver swims with a huge ocean sunfish, or Mola mola, off the coast of San Diego. They are the largest of the bony fish and often get mistaken for sharks due to their dorsal fins. They feed on jellyfish and plankton and are curious of humans, as seen in the photo. One threat to molas is drift nets, which they often get caught in, and garbage such as plastic bags that they mistake for jellyfish, their favorite food.

The scientific name of blob fish is Psychrolutes marcidus, mainly living in deep water along the coast of Australia and Tasmania which are rarely found by humans.

The scientific name of blob fish is Psychrolutes marcidus, mainly living in deep water along the coast of Australia and Tasmania which are rarely found by humans.

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