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Ishkhanasar, Syunik, Armenia / Իշխանասար, Սյունիք, Հայաստան

Ishkhanasar, Syunik, Armenia / Իշխանասար, Սյունիք, Հայաստան

For Armenians the pomegranate is one of the most recognizable symbols of the country.After the horrid events of the Armenian Genocide many Armenian artists have used pomegranates as a theme in their lyrics and poems to describe a wide range of emotions, from suffering to hope, rebirth and survival of a nation.

For Armenians the pomegranate is one of the most recognizable symbols of the country.After the horrid events of the Armenian Genocide many Armenian artists have used pomegranates as a theme in their lyrics and poems to describe a wide range of emotions, from suffering to hope, rebirth and survival of a nation.

Armenian Wheel of Eternity

The Armenian eternity sign is an ancient Armenian national symbol and a symbol of the national identity of the Armenian people. It is one of the most common symbols in Armenian architecture, carved on khachkars and on walls of churches.

Ararat....you always ,always,many thousands years belonged to Armenia,and only after genocide 1915 turks stolen you......but again for every armenian you still belong to Armenia,and every armenian ,living in any corner of the world...you part of armenian heart,like always.....You was Armenian, ,is Armenian and will be Armenian forever....

Photojournalist Karen Minasyan has traveled around Armenia’s wide sprawling plain overlooked by Biblical Mount Ararat to capture some of its spring bloom.

Andrew D. Chumbley (1967-2004) was an Essex-based artist and writer, and a doctoral candidate in comparative religions at SOAS University of London. His work primarily concerns witchcraft, magical history and oneirology. His published work includes Azoëtia: A Grimoire of the Sabbatic Craft, Qutub, The Grimoire of the Golden Toad, and The Satyr’s Sermon (2009), as well as numerous articles in journals of foklore and the occult.

Andrew D. Chumbley (1967-2004) was an Essex-based artist and writer, and a doctoral candidate in comparative religions at SOAS University of London. His work primarily concerns witchcraft, magical history and oneirology. His published work includes Azoëtia: A Grimoire of the Sabbatic Craft, Qutub, The Grimoire of the Golden Toad, and The Satyr’s Sermon (2009), as well as numerous articles in journals of foklore and the occult.

Shaina Mote Fall 17

Shaina Mote Fall 17