Polar Birds

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the bird is flying low over the snow covered hill side area in front of it
Arctic and Antarctic Birds — Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears
Photo: A giant petrel in flight near Palmer Station, Anvers Island, Antarctica. Photo courtesy of Henry Malmgren, National Science Foundation.
two birds sitting on top of a pile of snow next to each other with beaks in their mouths
Antarctica Photo Library
Blue-eyed shags are recognizable during the breeding season with their bright orange nasal caruncles and cobalt blue orbital ring. The color fades at the end of the mating season. Photograph by: Sean Bonnette National Science Foundation Date Taken: September 30, 2012
two birds sitting on top of a pile of snow next to each other with beaks in their mouths
Antarctica Photo Library
Blue-eyed shags are recognizable during the breeding season with their bright orange nasal caruncles and cobalt blue orbital ring. The color fades at the end of the mating season. Photograph by: Sean Bonnette National Science Foundation Date Taken: September 30, 2012
two penguins standing on rocks near the ocean
Changing Climate, Not Tourism, Seems to Be Driving Decline in Chinstrap-Penguin Populations- All Images | NSF
Photo of a chinstrap penguin on the Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: Jon Brack, National Science Foundation
several penguins are playing in the snow near an ice floet with one penguin jumping out of the water
Emperor's Gravity-Defying Leap
Emperor penguins may be flightless, but as this 2011 shot reveals, they're perfectly adapted to their semi-aquatic lifestyle. These penguins can dive more than 1600 feet (500 meters) down for up to 12 minutes. After a completed hunting spree, the birds launch themselves back onto the ice like feathery torpedoes. Image credit: Dr. Paul Ponganis, National Science Foundation
two penguins standing next to each other in the snow
Multimedia Gallery - Molting emperor penguin | NSF
A molting emperor penguin, Antarctica. Credit: Carlie Reum, National Science Foundation
a seagull sitting on top of snow covered rocks near the ocean at sunset
Antarctica Photo Library
Photograph by: Clair Von Handorf National Science Foundation Date Taken: August 22, 2012 A Snowy Sheathbill and a spectacular sunset near Palmer Station.
a penguin sitting on top of a rock next to another bird
How Do I Love Thee?
To call his mate, a male Adélie penguin uses a tried-and-true formula: flap flippers, tilt head to sky, then cut loose with a braying screech of a love song. It’s called an ecstatic call, and among penguins, it’s contagious. “One starts, and pretty soon everyone’s doing it,” said ecologist David Ainley. Ainley, who studies Adélie colonies in Antarctica, worked with a reporting team from WHOI during a 2007 Polar Discovery expedition at Cape Royds on Ross Island. (It is also sitting on an egg!)
a white bird sitting on top of a snow covered rock next to the ocean at sunset
Snowy Sheathbill--Anvers Island
This image is of a snowy sheathbill at Anvers Island, Antarctica. Snowy sheathbills are scavengers, acquiring much of their nourishment by stealing food already caught by penguins and shags or by eating human refuse. For this reason, they frequently live close to gentoo and chinstrap penguin or shag colonies. They primarily live around the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Sheathbills can grow to 40 centimeters (16 inches) in length with a wingspan of 79 centimeters (31 inches).
a seagull sitting on the ground in front of some tall grass and weeds
Antarctica Photo Library
The royal albatross breeds on remote islands around New Zealand. This photo was taken on Campbell Island
penguins are standing in front of a large ship
Antarctica Photo Library
Gentoo penguins watch the Research Vessel LAURENCE M. GOULD near Petermann Island. The GOULD is one of two research vessels operated by the National Science Foundation.
two penguins standing next to each other with their heads touching in front of one another
Antarctica Photo Library
Emperor penguin courtship involves trumpeting and bonding of pairs. They breed on sea-ice and most eggs are laid in May-June after which the male takes responsibility for the entire 62-66 days of incubation while the female is at sea finding food.
two birds sitting on top of each other near the water
Antarctica Photo Library
Cormorants or Blue-eyed shags are members of a large family of some 30 species living along the antarctic coastline. Two or three eggs are laid between October and January.
a white bird is standing on some rocks
Antarctica Photo Library
A snowy sheathbill near Palmer Station.
a brown and white bird sitting on some rocks
Antarctica Photo Library
A skua bird at Cape Royds, Ross Island. Skuas are predatory birds, much like seagulls.