Polar Invertebrates

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an underwater view of some white corals on the ocean floor with blue sky and clouds in the background
Antarctica Photo Library
Gersemia antarctica, also known as soft coral, under the sea ice near McMurdo Station, Ross Island. Photograph by: Rob Robbins, National Science Foundation, Date Taken: September 3, 2011
an orange spider sitting on top of a jellyfish in the dark water with it's legs spread out
Antarctica Photo Library
A sea spider and anemone feed on a jelly fish; McMurdo Sound. Photograph by: Steve Rupp, National Science Foundation, Date Taken: January 11, 2008
an orange and white spider sitting on top of a rock next to two eggs in it's mouth
Antarctica Photo Library
A sea spider in McMurdo Sound. Photograph by: Steve Rupp, National Science Foundation, Date Taken: February 8, 2008
some brown bugs are on top of something
Antarctica Photo Library
The larvae of Belgica antarctica, a flightless midge. Dr. Lee, distinguished professor of zoology at Miami University, studies Antarctica's only indigenous insect. Photograph by: Richard Lee, National Science Foundation, Date Taken: January 9, 2007
a jellyfish swimming in the water with it's head turned to the side
Multimedia Gallery - Lions Mane Jellyfish | NSF
A lions mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata). Every time a jellyfish pulses its bell, it draws water and entrained prey to its tentacles. The lions mane is one of the largest species of jellyfish. Clumping into giant formations, their tentacles--which may individually reach 100 feet in length--are lined with toxic stingers. That's longer than a 100-foot-long blue whale. The largest lions manes live in Arctic waters.
some pink and white sea anemones on the bottom of a green plant with yellow spiky leaves
New creatures found in Antarctic deep-sea vents | Earth | EarthSky
An expedition to explore the creatures of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the dark abyss of the Southern Ocean has revealed a “lost world,” straight out of a Jules Verne adventure. Scientists have found new species of crab, snail, sea star, barnacle, sea anemome, and even octopus. These animals thrive in total darkness, warmed by the heat of the vents, and mostly sustained by a food chain that begins with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria that thrive by the mineral-rich waters released from the vents. B
an octopus laying on the ground with its eyes open
New creatures found in Antarctic deep-sea vents | Earth | EarthSky
An expedition to explore the creatures of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the dark abyss of the Southern Ocean has revealed a “lost world,” straight out of a Jules Verne adventure. Scientists have found new species of crab, snail, sea star, barnacle, sea anemome, and even octopus. These animals thrive in total darkness, warmed by the heat of the vents, and mostly sustained by a food chain that begins with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria that thrive by the mineral-rich waters released from the vents. B
a red jellyfish swimming in the ocean
Antarctica Photo Library
A jellyfish under the Ross Sea ice.
two starfishs are swimming in the water near each other and one is pink
Antarctica Photo Library
Seastars and a feather star on the bottom of McMurdo Sound.
Diplasterias burcei, or star fish, can be found throughout the waters near Antarctica. This photo was taken under 5 meters of sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Fish, Animals, Star Fish
Antarctica Photo Library
Diplasterias burcei, or star fish, can be found throughout the waters near Antarctica. This photo was taken under 5 meters of sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.
an orange and white jellyfish floating in the water with sun shining on it's back
Antarctica Photo Library
This jellyfish photo was taken just offshore of McMurdo Station, Ross Island.