Gardening


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Gardening

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If this is your first season of yard care and gardening, heres the advice I wish Id been given when I was in your shoes.

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Easy Mod Podge French pots

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Transforms your rain spouts into a decorative climbing support of greenish black powder-coated weather proof aluminum

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Modern Formal Garden AMS Landscape Design Studios, Inc. by AMS Landscape Design Studios, Inc. Today, the formal parterre garden can be modified to fit any design scheme. We love how this example contains many traditional elements but is comfortable for lounging and contains modern touches that fit with the design scheme of the rest of the house.

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Add to Ideabookby Frank & Grossman Landscape Contractors, Inc. by Frank & Grossman Landscape Contractors, Inc. Formal parterre gardens traditionally contained some sort of focal point or central feature around which the rest of the garden was designed. This statue is beautiful and looks to be the focal point of this yard. Fountains or other water features are also fantastic anchors to the garden, and, for extra credit, incorporating an animal form makes them even more authentic.

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One color, many textures. An all-green planting scheme does a good job of illustrating how our eye reads textures in a single palette. The row of feathery papyrus stalks is silhouetted in front of a retaining wall, while the rounded clipped-box shapes on the hillside above have a heavier volume. Together, these different green textures create a pleasing visual tension — and balance.

Garden Design Essentials: Texture

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Garden Design : Texture At least two of the senses come into play when you bring texture into the landscape: touch and sight. Nothing could be truer in the outdoor world. Everything from smooth, polished river rocks to thorny agave plants has an inherent texture. But texture can be seen, too. Visual texture is an important design element for

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Great Flower bushes

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Move Pantry Plants Outdoors All the pantry plants you started off indoors over the winter can now start making the journey outdoors. Start with cold-hardy plants like beets and turnips, and save the ginger and potatoes for a little later in the month.

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You can also take cuttings from fall-blooming plants like this Montauk Daisy. When the buds start to open, the plant is in an active growing phase and will develop roots quickly when cut. Hardy plants like this can literally just be stuck into the ground and more than half will root without any help from you. Fussier plants may require rooting hormone, soilless starter pots and loads of attention.

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Transplant Perennials Once plants start emerging from the ground in spring, they are ready to be transplanted. This creeping sedum ('dragon's blood') is a good candidate for division. Simply dig up pieces of the plant with roots attached and plant the pieces elsewhere in your garden. The cloudy skies and abundant showers of April will help the newly transplanted babies get off to a good start.

Garden Musts for April

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Learn how to make newspaper pots at Cottage Hill Blog.

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Start More Seeds It is a good idea to start seeds in waves. You might have planted some earlier, and you might want to plant another set now. If temperatures are still too cold, try starting seeds in homemade cold frames. Make sure you save some for more planting later

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