Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit at the New York Historical Society

The Chinese Exclusion Act restricted Chinese immigration into the United States.
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The Federal Bureau of Investigation researched every Chinese immigrant's background to determine if entry could be denied. At immigration centers the Chinese had the burden of proving why they were exempt under the Exclusion Act.  (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation researched every Chinese immigrant's…

Beginning in 1892, persons of Chinese descent were required to carry photo identification cards.  Shown here are examples of some of those cards.  (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

Beginning in persons of Chinese descent were required to carry photo identification cards. Shown here are examples of some of those cards. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.

The Chinese attempting to immigrate to this country stayed in dormitories while their request was considered by U.S. officials.  Inspectors scrutinized all immigrants of Chinese descent to insure they met the necessary criteria to enter the U.S.  Many American officials worked to prove otherwise.  Between 1880 and 1930 the number of Chinese immigrants decreased by 30,000.  (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

The Chinese attempting to immigrate to this country stayed in dormitories while their request was considered by U.S. officials. Inspectors scrutinized all immigrants of Chinese descent to insure they met the necessary criteria to enter the U.S. Many American officials worked to prove otherwise. Between 1880 and 1930 the number of Chinese immigrants decreased by 30,000. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

Immigration and detention centers were established to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Act.  Chinese attempting to migrate here were presumed ineligible unless proven otherwise.  Records were kept on every Chinese person entering the country.  Photographs were taken, medical exams done, and interviews were conducted. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

Immigration and detention centers were established to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Act. Chinese attempting to migrate here were presumed ineligible unless proven otherwise. Records were kept on every Chinese person entering the country. Photographs were taken, medical exams done, and interviews were conducted. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

American citizens blamed the Chinese for their economic woes and accused them of taking away their jobs.  These beliefs led to discriminatory laws, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

American citizens blamed the Chinese for their economic woes and accused them of taking away their jobs. These beliefs led to discriminatory laws, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.

In 1892 President Harrison signed into law the Geary Act.  That Act extended the Exclusion Act for another 10 years.  It also required Chinese to register with the government and carry identification cards.  (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

In 1892 President Harrison signed into law the Geary Act. That Act extended the Exclusion Act for another 10 years. It also required Chinese to register with the government and carry identification cards. (The New York Historical Society Chinese Exclusion Act Exhibit.)

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