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Dress in (Historical) Style

A collection of historical costumes.


Dress in (Historical) Style

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This gown is made of a very thin, plain weave silk or taffeta with very fine stripes of red, blue and white, which, seen from afar, give the impression of mauve. A white leaf pattern is woven into the fabric and as well as floral sprays in various colours. Ugly hat! Production Date: 1762-1767

This gown and matching stomacher are made of very fine silk. Because of its shine or lustre, the fabric was called a lustring or lutestring. The process of 'lustrating' involved stretching and moistening the textile. In a 1756 treatise, silk designers are advised that ornaments for lustring ‘must be open and airy’ so as not to obscure the glazed ground. Production Date: 1752-1775

This dress and petticoat are made of very fine Indian muslin, a loosely woven cotton fabric. In line with the general simplification of clothing, the popularity of silks and brocades declined during the 1770s in favour of cotton textiles. The finest muslin was imported from India, but from the late 1780s British manufacturer tried to copy the Indian imports, at first without much success. Production Date: 1790

This magnificent gown originally belonged to Ann Fanshawe, daughter of Crisp Gascoyne who became Lord Mayor of the City of London in November 1753. This type of dress with its very wide skirt and short train was called a ‘mantua’. Mantua gowns are first mentioned in England around the 1670s. The name might have been derived from the French word for coat, manteau, or from Mantua, the Italian town where expensive silks were produced. Production Date: 1751-1752

A bright yellow Chinese silk damask dress. The robings, folds running alongside the edge of the bodice, and falling cuffs are trimmed with matching ruched ribbon. Cut in one piece with a falling-front skirt, sack-back, and provision for hoops, an underskirt stiffened with whalebone or bone to provide the desired shape. The bodice and sleeves are lined with natural plain-weave linen; the skirt is half-lined with rough, tabby weave cream English worsted. The fabric is a typical Chinese silk damask in its pattern. Production Date: 1751-1770

A pelisse or pelisse-coat, a kind of women's outer garment which could be made in everything from the lightest silk to heavy fur. It was worn over a gown but could look like a gown itself, especially when floor length like this garment. The pelisse was made for a trousseau in 1823 for the wedding of the grandmother of the donor. Production Date: 1823

coat; pelisse

A woman's white linen smock decorated with intricate bands of geometric cutwork taken from another object, possibly a cover, and used as insertions on the sleeves, cuffs, collar and upper part of the front. If worn underneath an open-necked gown, the exquisite needlework would have been visible Production Date: 1603-1610

Court gown worn by the Empress Maria Feodorovna, 1870s. Photo: Hermitage Museum.

Dress of the Week - Maria Feodorovna - Madame Guillotine

madameguillotine.org.uk

Mourning dress belonging to the Empress Maria Feodorovna, 1880s. Photo: State Hermitage Museum.

Dress of the Week - Maria Feodorovna - Madame Guillotine

madameguillotine.org.uk

Royal Ontario Museum: "Grand habit" or court robe with train, "en fourreau", and petticoat, said to belong to Marie-Antoinette of France Attributed to the dressmaker Marie-Jean "Rose" Bertin (1747 - 1813) Silk satin, applique, embroidered with metal threads, chenille, sequins and applied glass pastes 1780's, altered in 1870's Bourbon; Louis XVI Area of Origin: France

Royal Ontario Museum: "Grand habit" or court robe with train, "en fourreau", and petticoat, said to belong to Marie-Antoinette of France Attributed to the dressmaker Marie-Jean "Rose" Bertin (1747 - 1813) Silk satin, applique, embroidered with metal threads, chenille, sequins and applied glass pastes 1780's, altered in 1870's Bourbon; Louis XVI Area of Origin: France

Royal Ontario Museum: Woman's overdress or robe à la française with petticoat Spitalfield Brocaded silk trimmed with lace, gauze and silk flowers circa 1780-1785 Georgian; George III Area of Origin: England

18th-century-court-gown-cloth-of-silver. Lavish wedding gown worn by Hedwig Elizabeth Charlotte Holstein-Gottorp when she married her cousin, the future King Charles XIII of Sweden on the 7th of July 1774, Hedwig’s exquisite gown of silver tissue and lace, which accentuated her dainty 19″ waist, was made for her in Paris.

Marie Antoinette's wedding dress - Madame Guillotine

madameguillotine.org.uk

Doublet and trunk-hose of Don Garzia de' Medici, 1562, Palazzo Pitti, Firenze

Dress of Isabela Clara Eugenie, on the statue of Virgin Marz, 1598, Domschatzkammer Aachen, Toledo, oronoz.com

Early 15th c gold brocade dress of Margareta (1353 – 1412), Queen of Denmark, Sweden, Norway. The world's only preserved ball gown from the Middle Ages has been at Uppsala Cathedral since the 1600s.

Treasury - Svenska kyrkan - Uppsala domkyrkoförsamling

svenskakyrkan.se

Charles X Gustav of Sweden (1622-1660) Collection of the Royal Armoury. 1647.

There are two actual survivals of artefacts that we know Empress Matilda owned in her lifetime. One is a dalmatic (robe) of red-gold silk, still preserved today in the Parish church of Ambazac. C12th.

Doublet of Giovanni Battista Ligoza | c. 1555.

Dress of Pfalzgrafin Dorothea Sabina, 1598

Doublet Date: ca. 1580 Culture: European Medium: silk, metallic thread, brass Dimensions: Length at CB: 22 3/4 in. (57.8 cm) Credit Line: Catherine Breyer Van Bomel Foundation Fund, 1978 Accession Number: 1978.128 This artwork is not on display

Doublet | European | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Ball gown, Worth, 1886. Ivory silk satin with woven flowers of multicolored silk velvet, trimmed with green silk velvet. Centraal Museum, Utrecht

French silk evening dress, circa 1865.

Dress | French | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Ball gown, worn by the young queen Victoria to the Stewart Ball in 1851.