In 1938, nine months before the official beginning of WWII, England opened its borders to around 10,000 children - mostly Jewish - who were fleeing the Nazi regime. The children were sent, without their parents, out of Austria, Germany, Poland and Czechoslovakia in a process that became known as Kindertransport. At a time when most Jewish families were prevented from traveling abroad by lack of funds or stringent visa controls, this program was a miracle.

In 1938, nine months before the official beginning of WWII, England opened its borders to around 10,000 children - mostly Jewish - who were fleeing the Nazi regime. The children were sent, without their parents, out of Austria, Germany, Poland and Czechoslovakia in a process that became known as Kindertransport. At a time when most Jewish families were prevented from traveling abroad by lack of funds or stringent visa controls, this program was a miracle.

May 8th 1945, Winston Churchill waves to crowds in Whitehall on the day he broadcast to the nation that the war with Germany had been won.

May 8th 1945, Winston Churchill waves to crowds in Whitehall on the day he broadcast to the nation that the war with Germany had been won.

Artist super-imposes past pictures onto present locations. Dangerous crossing: Soldiers race up Avenue de Paris in Cherbourg in 1944, speeding past the rubble and over modern-day road markings.

Ghosts of war: Artist superimposes World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the same street scenes

Artist super-imposes past pictures onto present locations. Dangerous crossing: Soldiers race up Avenue de Paris in Cherbourg in 1944, speeding past the rubble and over modern-day road markings.

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