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    Wild Edibles

    • 418 Pins

    Purslane

    When is a weed not a weed? When it's purslane!

    examiner.com

    Finding next year's asparagus-- now is the time to spot it and make note of where it is for spring!

    Finding next year's asparagus

    examiner.com

    Foraging Sea Salt- who would have thought you could do this. awesome!

    Foraging Sea Salt

    handjobsforthehome.com

    11 great foods to forage with kids

    11 Ways to go foraging with your children

    examiner.com

    Dandelion syrup

    Dandelion syrup - sunshine in a jar!

    examiner.com

    So easy and works so well. This is how we have enough fruit pickers for all of the kids. :)

    Making your own fruit picker

    examiner.com

    Harvesting Cattail pollen... "Take a plastic bag and a pair of scissors into the cattail stand. Carefully bend the flower into the bag, and cut it off. Collect as many pollen-loaded flower heads as you can. Take them home, and let them sit undisturbed for a day. Then carefully shake them out inside the bag. This method yields far more pollen than shaking in the field."

    Hunger and Thirst: Wild About - Cattail Pollen

    hungerandthirstforlife.blogspot.com

    We love baby milkweed pods battered and fried! I dip them in a seasoned GF batter and then fry them in a little oil in a cast iron pan until golden and crispy on the outside. The inside sort of melts like a cheese popper inside. Only go for the little ones (under 2 inches) and leave lots to mature and go to seed.

    A NEW favorite wild edible: green milkweed seed pods!

    crunchymamasurbanhomestead.wordpress.com

    homemade crab apple juice

    Easy crab apple cider

    examiner.com

    Lots of recipes to use wild plums... Recipes to preserve them and in snacks, desserts, spreads, condiments and alcoholic drinks.

    Making use of wild plums

    examiner.com

    How to find apples, plums, pears, etc. on deserted homesteads in state/county parks and other not quite wild places...

    Feral foraging: not-quite-wild fruit

    examiner.com

    How to find wild plum trees

    The wily wild plum

    examiner.com

    Wild Crafting Wild, Foraging Wild, Edible Wild, Wild Food, Wildcraft Foraging, Wild Plants, Crafting Wild Edible, Wildcrafting Foraging, Wild Crafts Wild

    Finding the elusive elderberry

    examiner.com

    Raw, galinsoga tastes like pea greens. Cooked, it is spinachy, chardy, collardy, a sop for sauce and very similar in texture to the two plants that follow (use interchangeably in cooking). Use the leaves, and discard any fibrous stems. Wilt galinsoga greens as a side for every summer thing, from fire-cooked steaks to garlicky grilled chicken. Their light sweetness invites a dressing of soy, lime juice and sesame oil. Heat them with a little butter and top with a soft-cooked egg for breakfast.

    In Summer, These 3 Edibles Are Wildly Abundant

    ediblemanhattan.com

    galinsogaplus amaranth: "This garden amaranth is an appealing and versatile cooked green. It is also very nutritious, as many rural African or South American mothers will tell you; it feeds families when the larder is bare. Even for this well-fed cook, it is a favorite summer vegetable, when warm weather has sent the chard and kale into hiding. Its tender stems are edible, too, soft after cooking, and I snap them off in green bunches to employ in the kitchen...."

    In Summer, These 3 Edibles Are Wildly Abundant

    ediblemanhattan.com

    Lamb’s-quarters are wonderful in a simple, chicken-stock- based soup, the leaves dropped into the boiling liquid for a few minutes before being pureed smooth with some lemon juice. Perk that up with a soft poached egg. Once the flowers have set young green seeds — pseudograins — these, too, are edible, nutty after a quick steam and with a slick of butter.

    In Summer, These 3 Edibles Are Wildly Abundant

    ediblemanhattan.com

    Foraging for Horseradish (and the World’s Best Horseradish Sauce Recipe) on www.realepicurean...

    Foraging for Horseradish (and the World’s Best Horseradish Sauce Recipe)

    realepicurean.com

    The Mushroom Forager-- how to make super healthy chaga tea or tincture (very good for the immune system, anti-tumor properties)

    Medicinal Mushrooms

    themushroomforager.com

    The Restorative Reishi (lots of info)

    The Restorative Reishi

    themushroomforager.com

    Edible Weeds 101: The Health Benefits of Stinging Nettles

    Edible Weeds 101: The Health Benefits of Stinging Nettles

    motherearthliving.com

    Foraging With Paul: Lessons From A Mycologist

    Foraging With Paul: Lessons From A Mycologist

    communitynaturalfoods.com

    My kids all know to find plantain and use it on nettle stings and bites and such! "Plantain has often been the go-to remedy for hikers plagued by mosquitoes. Because it draws toxins from the body with its astringent nature, plantain may be crushed (or chewed) and placed as a poultice directly over the site of bee stings, bug bites, acne, slivers, glass splinters, or rashes."

    Broadleaf Plantain: Pictures, Flowers, Leaves and Identification

    lifeadvancer.com

    White clover: medicinal uses: cleanses blood, boils, sores, wounds, etc., heals disorders and diseases of the eye. A tea is used to treat coughs, colds, fevers and leucorrhea. A tincture of the leaves can be applied as an ointment for gout. A tea of the flowers used as an eyewash.

    White Clover - Trifolium repens

    montana.plant-life.org

    There’s so much to say about goldenrod that it’s hard to know where to begin. I embarked on a journey to learn about this plant shortly after completing my clinical herbal apprentice program and today it has become an ally and a staple in my home. I enjoy learning about the plants that are all around me and easily accessible, a true believer that Mother Nature gives us what we need....

    Health Benefits of Goldenrod - Herbal Academy of New England

    herbalacademyofne.com

    How and where to forage for wild horseradish: After the first frosts or some really cold nights, the leaves will turn brown and wrinkled. Make a note of where the plants are by means of a marker – a painted stone or stick will do. Now wait until the plant dies right back and then go find your markers and dig the root up before the next frost – not during, or you may break the fork handle! Dig around the plant, lifting slightly as you go until the whole plant is raised. Keep the plant whole and..

    How and where to forage for wild horseradish | Foraging

    vegetarianliving.co.uk