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Wild Edibles


Wild Edibles

  • 322 Pins

Elderberry boosts immunity and cures eight known strains of flu

How to make a fermented beverage from stinging nettles

52 Weeks of Bad A** Bacteria – Week 17 – Ferment The Nettle Harvest

deliciousobsessions.com

Southern Forager: Easy Dandelion Honey Mead!

Easy Dandelion Honey Mead!

southernforager.blogspot.com

How to make stinging nettle fertilizer for the garden: Quick method – For the quick method, steep one ounce of nettles in 1 cup of boiling water for 20 minutes to an hour, then strain the leaves and stems out and toss in the compost bin. Dilute the fertilizer 1:10 and it’s ready for use. This quick method will give a subtler result than the following method. Long range method – You can also make nettle garden fertilizer by filling a large jar or bucket with the leaves and stems, bruising the foliage first. Weight down the nettles with a brick, paving stone, or whatever you have laying around and then cover with water. Only fill three-quarters of the bucket with water to allow room for the foam that will be created during the brewing process. Use non-chlorinated water, possibly from a rain barrel, and set the bucket in a semi-sunny area, preferably away from the house since the process will likely be a tad smelly. Leave the mix for one to three weeks to ferment, stirring every couple of days until it stops bubbling.

Nettle Garden Fertilizer: Information On Making And Using Nettles As Fertilizer

gardeningknowhow.com

The next time you're driving along in the country, look out the window for clumps of spindly, dark green plants that look like wispy Christmas trees. Congratulations -- you've found wild asparagus!

Looking out for asparagus

examiner.com

10 Tips for Hunting Morel Mushrooms -- Morels like it when it starts to get around 60 degrees and above during the day, and night temperatures hover around 40 degrees. Check those south-facing slopes early in the season. Elm, ash, poplar and apple trees are well-known morel mushroom favorites. Morels like loamy soil. Burn sites and logging areas are often prime morel locations. A warm spring rain can be just the right medicine for getting morels to show themselves.

10 Tips for Hunting Morel Mushrooms this Spring

wideopenspaces.com

Southern Forager: Black Locust Blossom Wine

Black Locust Blossom Wine

southernforager.blogspot.com

It's asparagus time (info on how to find, how to harvest)

It's asparagus time!

examiner.com

green onion (ramp) kimchi

Wild Onion Kimchi

honest-food.net

ramp chard dumplings appetite for china

Ramp and Swiss Chard Dumplings

appetiteforchina.com

Side by side, thorough descriptions of blackberry (left) versus black raspberry in terms of leaves, canes, etc. Good comparison.

Blackberry? or black raspberry?

identifythatplant.com

ramp salt

How to make Ramp Salt

kitchen-apparel.com

Wild Edibles: How to Use Lambsquarter From Root to Seed – Real Food – MOTHER EARTH NEWS: "Wild lambsquarter plants vary in their tastes. The flavor is related not only to different species, but also to the stages of growth and to the soil conditions. In general, however, all lambsquarter leaves are edible. The wild greens can be used just like spinach. They can be eaten fresh in salads, juiced, and added to any recipes that call for greens. They are best eaten when younger, however; when the leaves mature with age, the flavor can change due to a greater potency of oxalic acids. I find that when lambsquarter has built up too many oxalic acids, I experience a slight burning sensation in the back of my throat. This is why I recommend tasting the leaves by themselves before harvesting any quantity of them."

Wild Edibles: How to Use Lambsquarter From Root to Seed

motherearthnews.com

Year-Round Northwest Foraging Calendar

Year-Round Northwest Foraging Calendar

oregonlive.com

Preserving Ramps: Loosely chop the green leaves and wash. Dry them thoroughly using a salad spinner or a towel. Finely chop the leaves in a food processor with a dash of salt and a few splashes of olive oil (about 3-4 cups leaves to a 1/2 cup of oil). The goal is to create a moist, spreadable paste. It shouldn’t be dripping, but it shouldn’t be dry either. Pack into small baggies or small freezable containers and freeze. You can also portion it out by freezing in ice cube trays and later popping them into long term storage containers once they’ve formed into hardened cubes.

Preserving Spring Ramps - You Grow Girl

yougrowgirl.com

Ten more dandelion recipes to make with kids (dandelion syrup, dandelion petal sorbet, dandelion pineapple juice, dandelion lemonade...)

Ten more dandelion recipes to make with kids

examiner.com

Dandelion syrup

Dandelion syrup - sunshine in a jar!

examiner.com

25 foraging groups and pages on Facebook

25 Fantastic foraging groups and pages on Facebook

examiner.com

Cooking with Spring Nettles: Where to Begin: "If you want to use them easily and without a recipe, here's what you can do: if you use parsley at home, I use nettles in much the same way. After boiling them, I chop them up and toss bits into everything from omelettes to sauces. I find the best way to get comfortable with them is to start using the heck out of them and then figure out how you enjoy them most. "

Cooking with Spring Nettles: Where to Begin

thekitchn.com

A Tale of Two Ramp Celebrations