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    Queen Victoria with grandchildren, from left: Prince Albert Victor of Wales, Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, Princes George of Wales and Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and by Rhine

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    Princess Alice and Prince Louis of Hesse | Royal Collection Trust

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    Queen Alexandra (then the Princess of Wales) with her daughter Princess Maud of Wales (the future Queen Maud of Norway).

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    Princess Victoria, Princess Louise and Princess Maud of Wales.

    Louise with Victoria and Maud

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    Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, the seventh child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

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    Queen Victoria with Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence, Princess Alix of Hesse (later Empress of Russia), Princess Beatrice and Princess Irene of Hesse

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    The four sons of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert: Prince Albert, later Edward VII, Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, later Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, and Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany

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    Victoria 1837-1901. Married her cousin Albert and they had 9 children. Her reign saw the beginning of the Industrial revolution. The British Empire stretched all around the world, and was at its largest while she was Queen. Victoria was made Empress of India.

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    Isambard K. Brunel (left-hand in pocket) watches launch of iron steam ship "SS Great Eastern" on Thames, London,1857

    Old Pics Archive on Twitter

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    Prince Leopold fourth son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Duke of Albany and his wife Princess Helena Duchess of Albany.

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    John Brown sits for a portrait c. 1850. He was the personal attendant to Queen Victoria who often stayed at Balmoral, her Highland retreat, after the death of her beloved Prince Albert in 1861. The Queen and her ghillie John Brown became such close friends that their relationship caused scandal throughout the court and government of the time. Brown served with her for 18 years before he died at Windsor.

    Show us your Vintage Kilt Photos - Page 3

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    Queen Victoria and Edward VII - a commemoration of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee

    Queen Victoria's England

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    The dress Queen Victoria wore to the Great Exhibition, 1851.

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    The Crystal Palace, and Its Contents; Being an Illustrated Cyclopaedia of the Great Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations. Published by W. M. Clark. London. 1852.

    Follow the Heart

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    Sherbet and water seller in Cheapside, London, photographed by Paul Martin, circa 1900

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    1900. THE LATEST PORTRAIT OF QUEEN VICTORIA

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    Vicky and her son Wilhelm looking happy.

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    Princesses of Hesse - daughters of Princess Alice

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    Photograph of locksmith by John Thomson, 1876

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    Title page and illustration from Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management

    The Middle Class

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    Mrs Beeton, Illustration of crockery

    The Middle Class

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    Travelling on Public Transport, Image from the Graphic Newspaper, 1895

    The Middle Class

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    Illustration of Ladies' Fashions, from The Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine, 1860

    The Middle Class

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    The Victorian era was a golden age, for the middle class. The huge army of clerks worked from nine to four, or ten to five. For those without a grouse moor, a family seaside holiday in Brighton or Margate could be just as refreshing.

    The Middle Class

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    Cremorne Gardens, in Chelsea, opened in the 1840s, with a thousand flickering gas lights, a theatre, firework displays and an American bowling alley – claimed to be the first in London. By day Cremorne was thronged with respectable parties, but they went home by ten o’clock and hundreds of prostitutes took their places.

    Popular Culture

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