Photo taken by Alexander Gardner that's been colorized. This photo was taken in 1865 just two months before President Lincoln was killed.

Abraham Lincoln in Color (1865

Photo taken by Alexander Gardner that's been colorized. This photo was taken in 1865 just two months before President Lincoln was killed.

A navy photographer snapped this photograph of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, just as the USS Shaw exploded.

A navy photographer snapped this photograph of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, just as the USS Shaw exploded.

*GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN~ leaning on breach of gun, and staff at Federal Fort No. 7. The picture shows War in the West. These photographs are of Sherman in Atlanta, September-November, 1864. After three and a half months of incessant maneuvering and much hard fighting, Sherman forced Hood to abandon the munitions center of the Confederacy. Sherman remained there, resting his war-worn men and accumulating supplies, for nearly two and a half months.

*GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN~ leaning on breach of gun, and staff at Federal Fort No. 7. The picture shows War in the West. These photographs are of Sherman in Atlanta, September-November, 1864. After three and a half months of incessant maneuvering and much hard fighting, Sherman forced Hood to abandon the munitions center of the Confederacy. Sherman remained there, resting his war-worn men and accumulating supplies, for nearly two and a half months.

Abraham Lincoln’s catafalque, a temporary structure built to support his coffin during the three days he lay in state in the U. S. Capitol Rotunda in April 1865. Although the original photographer is unknown, we do know that D.C. Burnite of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, created this small size photographic print called a carte-de-visite. Many people collected mementos like this to help them visualize the events of President Lincoln’s funeral and as a way of expressing the national grief.

Abraham Lincoln’s catafalque, a temporary structure built to support his coffin during the three days he lay in state in the U. S. Capitol Rotunda in April 1865. Although the original photographer is unknown, we do know that D.C. Burnite of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, created this small size photographic print called a carte-de-visite. Many people collected mementos like this to help them visualize the events of President Lincoln’s funeral and as a way of expressing the national grief.

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