The term “dreadlocks” comes from a movement of guerrilla warriors who vowed not to cut their hair until Haile Selassie, former Emperor of Ethiopia was released from exile after leading the resistance against the Italian invasion. The warriors hair became matted and began to lock over time. Because the warriors with locks in their head were “dreaded” the term “dreadlocks” came to frui

The term “dreadlocks” comes from a movement of guerrilla warriors who vowed not to cut their hair until Haile Selassie, former Emperor of Ethiopia was released from exile after leading the resistance against the Italian invasion. The warriors hair became matted and began to lock over time. Because the warriors with locks in their head were “dreaded” the term “dreadlocks” came to frui

The Black Seminoles are a small offshoot of the Gullah slaves who escaped from the rice plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. They built their own settlements on the Florida frontier, fought a series of wars to preserve their freedom, and were scattered across North America. They have played a significant role in American history, but have never received the recognition they deserve.

The Black Seminoles are a small offshoot of the Gullah slaves who escaped from the rice plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. They built their own settlements on the Florida frontier, fought a series of wars to preserve their freedom, and were scattered across North America. They have played a significant role in American history, but have never received the recognition they deserve.

A controversial homemade doll known as a“topsy-turvy doll,” The topsy-turvies existed because the slave masters actually didn’t want the slave children to have dolls that looked like themselves, which would give them a sense of empowerment. “When the slave master was gone, the kids would have the black side, but when the slave master was around, they would have the white side."

A controversial homemade doll known as a“topsy-turvy doll,” The topsy-turvies existed because the slave masters actually didn’t want the slave children to have dolls that looked like themselves, which would give them a sense of empowerment. “When the slave master was gone, the kids would have the black side, but when the slave master was around, they would have the white side."

The most untalked about, unappreciated, unknown giant in the African American community - [b. 1910 - d. 1985] Vivien Thomas

The most untalked about, unappreciated, unknown giant in the African American community - [b. 1910 - d. 1985] Vivien Thomas

Hector Pieterson, who was born in 1964, was one of the first schoolchildren to be shot on 16 June 1976; he was just 13 years old. The iconic picture, taken by Sam Nzima, of a dying Hector being carried by Mbuyisa Makhubo with his sister, Antoinette Sithole, running alongside, has become a symbol of the times.

Hector Pieterson, who was born in 1964, was one of the first schoolchildren to be shot on 16 June 1976; he was just 13 years old. The iconic picture, taken by Sam Nzima, of a dying Hector being carried by Mbuyisa Makhubo with his sister, Antoinette Sithole, running alongside, has become a symbol of the times.

The Little Rock Nine were a group of African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The ensuing Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, and then attended after the intervention of President Eisenhower, is considered to be one of the most important events in the African American Civil Rights Movement.

The Little Rock Nine were a group of African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The ensuing Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, and then attended after the intervention of President Eisenhower, is considered to be one of the most important events in the African American Civil Rights Movement.

On This Day 1904: Mary McLeod Bethune opens her first school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida. The school eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and Bethune went on to become an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

On This Day 1904: Mary McLeod Bethune opens her first school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida. The school eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and Bethune went on to become an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Victim of slave trade, black male from Africa dumped in the sea. Statue to remind us of the sacrifices and suffering of our ancestors

Victim of slave trade, black male from Africa dumped in the sea. Statue to remind us of the sacrifices and suffering of our ancestors

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