Storm Chasing

Meteorological components and videos of severe weather conditions.
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Nebraska supercell June 2011

Nebraska supercell June 2011 Shit like this both terrifies and amazes me- horrifying beauty

Double Lightning Bolts, Nebraska, May 26th 2013. John Finney.

The top 10 weather photographs shared in the Mr Twister Weather Snapshot group on April 2014 John Finney Likes) Double Lightning Bolts, Nebraska

Mile-wide tornado splits into three large suction vortices near Pipestone, Manitoba on June 23, 2007.

Mile-wide tornado splits into three large suction vortices near Pipestone, Manitoba on June Easily could have intercepted this tornado if we had the Dominator. Check out the video here:

The McFarlin Library at the University of Tulsa (TU) in Oklahoma recently acquired a photograph of a tornado that hit Oklahoma City on May 12, 1896. Taken by Thomas Croft, who also documented the reservation life of the pre-statehood Oklahoma and Indian territories, it’s one of 24 cabinet cards acquired by TU from the collection of Esther Hoyt.

Tornado photographed by Thomas Croft in Oklahoma City (May (courtesy University of Tulsa Special Collections and University Archives)

Horse latitudes or subtropical highs are subtropical latitudes between 30 and 38 degrees both north and south where Earth's atmosphere is dominated by the subtropical high, an area of high pressure, which suppresses precipitation and cloud formation, and has variable winds mixed with calm.

From Pole to Pole: The Inescapable Reach of Global Warming

"This dramatic example of Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds was taken near the Galapagos Islands last week. The shark-fin-like clouds are the result of two air layers moving past one another. The velocity difference at their interface creates an unstable shear layer that quickly breaks down. The resemblance of the clouds to breaking ocean waves is no coincidence – the wind moving over the ocean’s surface generates waves via the same Kelvin-Helmholtz instability."

This dramatic example of Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds was taken near the Galapagos Islands last week. The shark-fin-like clouds are the result of two air layers moving past one another. The velocity.

Hypercanes: The Next Big Disaster Movie? - YouTube

Do you ever think of what could cause the next big extinction? How about a super massive tropical storm that sweeps over continents? Hey, it could happen! Check out this SciShow Dose to see how a hypercane would be possible.

Do you ever think of what could cause the next big extinction? How about a super massive tropical storm that sweeps over continents? Hey, it could happen! Check out this SciShow Dose to see how a hypercane would be possible.

Do you ever think of what could cause the next big extinction? How about a super massive tropical storm that sweeps over continents? Hey, it could happen! Check out this SciShow Dose to see how a hypercane would be possible.

Shortwaves are often associated with warm (WAA) or cold air advection (CAA), which influence temperature. Due to the way they curve the air that moves around them and the way air moves away from them, shortwaves produce positive curvature vorticity and positive shear vorticity, respectively.

Shortwaves are often associated with warm (WAA) or cold air advection (CAA), which influence temperature. Due to the way they curve the air that moves around them and the way air moves away from them, shortwaves produce positive curvature vorticity and positive shear vorticity, respectively.

The Westerlies, anti-trades, or Prevailing Westerlies, are prevailing winds from the west toward the east in the middle latitudes between 30-60 degrees latitude. They originate from the high-pressure areas in the horse latitudes. Tropical cyclones which cross the subtropical ridge axis into the Westerlies recurve due to the increased westerly flow.

The westerlies (blue arrows) and trade winds (yellow and brown arrows)

An anticyclone is a weather phenomenon defined as "a large-scale circulation of winds around a central region of high atmospheric pressure, clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, anti-clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere". Effects of surface-based anticyclones include clearing skies as well as cooler, drier air. Fog can also form overnight within a region of higher pressure.

An anticyclone is a weather phenomenon defined as "a large-scale circulation of winds around a central region of high atmospheric pressure, clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, anti-clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere". Effects of surface-based anticyclones include clearing skies as well as cooler, drier air. Fog can also form overnight within a region of higher pressure.

The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), known by sailors as the doldrums, is the area encircling the earth near the equator where the northeast & southeast trade winds come together. When the ITCZ is drawn into & merges with a monsoonal circulation, it is sometimes referred to as a monsoon trough, a usage more common in Australia and parts of Asia. In seamen's speech the zone is referred to as the doldrums because of its erratic weather patterns with stagnant calms & violent…

Intertropical Convergence Zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The monsoon trough is a portion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone as depicted by a line on a weather map showing the locations of minimum sea level pressure, and as such, is a convergence zone between the wind patterns of the southern and northern hemispheres.

The monsoon trough is a portion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone as depicted by a line on a weather map showing the locations of minimum sea level pressure, and as such, is a convergence zone between the wind patterns of the southern and northern hemispheres.

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