1. Put on nail polish and let dry.  2. Dip fingernail in alcohol-basically any will do, vodka is suggested.  3. Press a strip of newspaper big enough to cover the whole nail on to your alcohol soaked nail.  4.  Pull off slowly and be really impressed with yourself. 5. Paint top coat if desired.

1. Put on nail polish and let dry. 2. Dip fingernail in alcohol-basically any will do, vodka is suggested. 3. Press a strip of newspaper big enough to cover the whole nail on to your alcohol soaked nail. 4. Pull off slowly and be really impressed with yourself. 5. Paint top coat if desired.

Glowing jar project

Glowing jar project – varázslat a lakásban (EN/HU)

Aerogel, also know as frozen smoke, is the world’s lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it’s practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it’s like styrofoam. It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a direct blast from two pounds of dynamite. It’s also the best insulator in existence.

Frozen smoke.

Aerogel, also know as frozen smoke, is the world’s lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it’s practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it’s like styrofoam. It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a direct blast from two pounds of dynamite. It’s also the best insulator in existence.

The head of the 1ft 6in high Pollia condensata plant that ranges from Ethiopia to Angola and Mozambique, which scientists today revealed as the most colourful plant ever seen. Pollia condensata's vivid sparkle comes from the interaction of light with its skin, which contains layers of microscopic cellulose fibers. The effect is a metallic blue brighter than any yet described in a biological material.

The breathtaking African rainforest fruit that is the 'most colourful known to science'

The head of the 1ft 6in high Pollia condensata plant that ranges from Ethiopia to Angola and Mozambique, which scientists today revealed as the most colourful plant ever seen. Pollia condensata's vivid sparkle comes from the interaction of light with its skin, which contains layers of microscopic cellulose fibers. The effect is a metallic blue brighter than any yet described in a biological material.

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