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Clouds


Clouds

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The higher the clouds, the more chance of a tornado. Read an article on cumulous cloud formations.

Night Supercell

Fire rainbow cloud: The rare phenomenon appeared behind a storm cloud near Delray Beach, Florida

An Amazing Storm

a bit better detail

these look like scoops of ice cream!

shelf cloud: a low, horizontal, wedge-shaped arcus cloud. A shelf cloud is attached to the base of the parent cloud, which is usually a thunderstorm, but could form on any type of convective clouds. Rising cloud motion often can be seen in the leading (outer) part of the shelf cloud, while the underside often appears turbulent and wind-torn. Cool, sinking air from a storm cloud's downdraft spreads out across the land surface, with the leading edge called a gust front.

A roll cloud is a low, horizontal, tube-shaped, and relatively rare type of arcus cloud. They differ from shelf clouds by being completely detached from other cloud features. Roll clouds usually appear to be "rolling" about a horizontal axis. They are a solitary wave called a soliton, which is a wave that has a single crest and moves without changing speed or shape.

wall cloud

anvil cloud from above

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skeletal 'classic' supercell (strongest and longest lasting type of storm).

Wall cloud: (or pedestal cloud) is a large, lowering cloud formation that develops beneath the base of a cumulonimbus cloud that often forms tornadoes. It is typically beneath the rain-free base (RFB) portion of a thunderstorm, and indicates the area of the strongest updraft within a storm. Wall clouds are sometimes an indication of a rotating mesocyclone in a thunderstorm, and most strong tornadoes form from wall clouds. However, wall clouds do not always rotate.

"Mammatus clouds are most often associated with the anvil cloud and severe thunderstorms. They often extend from the base of a cumulonimbus, but may also be found under altocumulus, altostratus, stratocumulus, and cirrus clouds, as well as volcanic ash clouds. When occurring in cumulonimbus, mammatus are often indicative of a particularly strong storm or perhaps even a tornadic storm."

Asperatus Clouds, "Canterbury Arch"

Mount Fuji lenticular Clouds

Cumulonimbus-incus

Asperatus clouds

Strange twirl clouds in the sky above Grytviken, South Georgia Island.

Sonora Borealis - This highly unusual cloud formation was likely formed from the exhaust of a rocket launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Southern California roughly an hour before this capture. The photo was taken from a mountain ridge near Tucson, AZ. (by Peaquod, via Flickr)