An Artwork a Day

keep up with New York's art scene with my daily featured artworks.
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Nature is vast, mankind is tiny in Cuban painter Tomas Sanchez’s landscapes. Here, a solitary cloud patrols a wooded terrain conspicuously absent of humans. (On view at Marlborough Contemporary through Feb 10th). Tomas Sanchez, Thought Cloud, acrylic on canvas, 78 x 98 inches, 2017.

Nature is vast, mankind is tiny in Cuban painter Tomas Sanchez’s landscapes. Here, a solitary cloud patrols a wooded terrain conspicuously absent of humans. (On view at Marlborough Contemporary through Feb 10th). Tomas Sanchez, Thought Cloud, acrylic on canvas, 78 x 98 inches, 2017.

The weeks turn to years in Byron Kim’s diaristic notes, jotted on his paintings of the sky on successive Sundays since 2001. The towers fall, Obama is elected president, Kim worries over his kids, ponders his work and enjoys an active social life - all set against the backdrop of shifting weather. (On view at James Cohan Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 17th). Byron Kim, installation view of ‘Sunday Paintings, 1/7/01 to 2/11/18’ at James Cohan Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 17th.

The weeks turn to years in Byron Kim’s diaristic notes, jotted on his paintings of the sky on successive Sundays since 2001. The towers fall, Obama is elected president, Kim worries over his kids, ponders his work and enjoys an active social life - all set against the backdrop of shifting weather. (On view at James Cohan Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 17th). Byron Kim, installation view of ‘Sunday Paintings, 1/7/01 to 2/11/18’ at James Cohan Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 17th.

The Museum of Modern Art’s current retrospective of Stephen Shore’s photography lauds his ‘poetics of the ordinary.’ Shot in Montana, though not obviously linked to a particular location, this composition at 303 Gallery encourages viewers to find aesthetic interest in unexpected times and places. (On view in Chelsea through Feb 17th). Stephen Shore, installation view of Three Forks, Montana, August 6, 2017, pigment print, 64 x 48 inches, printed 2017.

The Museum of Modern Art’s current retrospective of Stephen Shore’s photography lauds his ‘poetics of the ordinary.’ Shot in Montana, though not obviously linked to a particular location, this composition at 303 Gallery encourages viewers to find aesthetic interest in unexpected times and places. (On view in Chelsea through Feb 17th). Stephen Shore, installation view of Three Forks, Montana, August 6, 2017, pigment print, 64 x 48 inches, printed 2017.

“And yet it moves” is the translated titled of this new monumental steel sculpture by Mark di Suvero, referring to Galileo’s 17th century assertion (despite pressure from the Inquisition) that the earth is not stable. Likewise, this formidably weighty sculpture looks fixed but will rock on its axis if set in motion. (On view at Paula Cooper Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 3rd.) Mark di Suvero, Eppur si Muove, stainless steel, 10.5 x 28 x 12 feet, 2017 – 2017.

“And yet it moves” is the translated titled of this new monumental steel sculpture by Mark di Suvero, referring to Galileo’s 17th century assertion (despite pressure from the Inquisition) that the earth is not stable. Likewise, this formidably weighty sculpture looks fixed but will rock on its axis if set in motion. (On view at Paula Cooper Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 3rd.) Mark di Suvero, Eppur si Muove, stainless steel, 10.5 x 28 x 12 feet, 2017 – 2017.

Sublime images of cliff faces by Japanese artist Hiroshi Senju (as seen in detail here) begin as mulberry washi paper, sourced from a specialist paper maker who can only make the paper in winter. After creating texture by hand-rumpling the large paper sheets, Senju uses handmade brushes and natural and synthetic pigments to render the natural world as apparition. (On view at Sundaram Tagore Gallery in Chelsea through Jan 13th). Hiroshi Senju, detail of At World’s End #11, acrylic and natural…

Sublime images of cliff faces by Japanese artist Hiroshi Senju (as seen in detail here) begin as mulberry washi paper, sourced from a specialist paper maker who can only make the paper in winter. After creating texture by hand-rumpling the large paper sheets, Senju uses handmade brushes and natural and synthetic pigments to render the natural world as apparition. (On view at Sundaram Tagore Gallery in Chelsea through Jan 13th). Hiroshi Senju, detail of At World’s End #11, acrylic and natural…

If a hard-edged abstract painting liberated itself from the stretcher and tottered off, it might look something like Billy Copley’s acrylic on paper sculpture, which appears to be blowing streamers for the new year. (On view at Edward Thorp Gallery in Chelsea through Jan 27th). Billy Copley, The Rosewater Dish, acrylic and prepared paper on formed paper, 30 ½h x 36w x 23d inches, 2017.

If a hard-edged abstract painting liberated itself from the stretcher and tottered off, it might look something like Billy Copley’s acrylic on paper sculpture, which appears to be blowing streamers for the new year. (On view at Edward Thorp Gallery in Chelsea through Jan 27th). Billy Copley, The Rosewater Dish, acrylic and prepared paper on formed paper, 30 ½h x 36w x 23d inches, 2017.

Wang Ningde’s ‘Form of Light’ images, currently on view at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in Chelsea, appear to be photos but fool the eye. From straight on, thin strips of photographic film disappear and visitors see only the projection of images underneath, arranged via projection software to synch with the gallery’s light sources. (On view through Feb 17th). Wang Ningde, Thicket No. 4, transparency film, acrylic, honeycomb aluminum board, 78 x 54 ½ inches, 2017.

Wang Ningde’s ‘Form of Light’ images, currently on view at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in Chelsea, appear to be photos but fool the eye. From straight on, thin strips of photographic film disappear and visitors see only the projection of images underneath, arranged via projection software to synch with the gallery’s light sources. (On view through Feb 17th). Wang Ningde, Thicket No. 4, transparency film, acrylic, honeycomb aluminum board, 78 x 54 ½ inches, 2017.

Granted access to Nation of Islam leadership and communities in 1963, Life photographer Gordon Parks shot remarkable images including this portrait of women’s leader Ethel Sharrieff. Now on view at Jack Shainman Gallery’s 24th Street location, the arresting show overviews selections from Parks’ lesser-known yet powerful series. (On view through Feb 10th). Gordon Parks, Ethel Sharrieff, Chicago, Illinois, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16 inches, 1963.

Granted access to Nation of Islam leadership and communities in 1963, Life photographer Gordon Parks shot remarkable images including this portrait of women’s leader Ethel Sharrieff. Now on view at Jack Shainman Gallery’s 24th Street location, the arresting show overviews selections from Parks’ lesser-known yet powerful series. (On view through Feb 10th). Gordon Parks, Ethel Sharrieff, Chicago, Illinois, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16 inches, 1963.

Levittown – a post WWII house development of 17,500 homes on Long Island seen from an aerial view on the gallery wall – has become synonymous with the crushing conformity of the suburbs. Brian Tolle’s carefully researched replica of the Levittown Cape Cod style house is realized in platinum silicon rubber and rests on a beanbag, armchair, kids toys and other typical items from American homes. In the gallery, Tolle’s deflated forms suggesting the melting away of past attitudes and lifestyles…

Levittown – a post WWII house development of 17,500 homes on Long Island seen from an aerial view on the gallery wall – has become synonymous with the crushing conformity of the suburbs. Brian Tolle’s carefully researched replica of the Levittown Cape Cod style house is realized in platinum silicon rubber and rests on a beanbag, armchair, kids toys and other typical items from American homes. In the gallery, Tolle’s deflated forms suggesting the melting away of past attitudes and lifestyles…

From papier-mâché to paintings on panel, Barry McGee’s exhibition of recent work at Cheim & Read is packed with a superabundance of objects bearing McGee’s signature patterns and logos. In the back, a stack of surfboards is typical of the show’s visual overload, speaking to McGee’s boundless creative impulse. (On view in Chelsea through Feb 17th.) Barry McGee, Untitled, surfboards, dimensions variable, 2017.

From papier-mâché to paintings on panel, Barry McGee’s exhibition of recent work at Cheim & Read is packed with a superabundance of objects bearing McGee’s signature patterns and logos. In the back, a stack of surfboards is typical of the show’s visual overload, speaking to McGee’s boundless creative impulse. (On view in Chelsea through Feb 17th.) Barry McGee, Untitled, surfboards, dimensions variable, 2017.

Paris-based Italian artist Beatrice Caracciolo’s ‘Tramontana’ refers in its title to a cold north wind, which appears to cause a landscape to hunker down in this expressive ink on paper artwork. (On view at Paula Cooper Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 3rd). Beatrice Caracciolo, Tramontana, water soluble ink on paper, 58 x 65 x 1 inches, 2017.

Paris-based Italian artist Beatrice Caracciolo’s ‘Tramontana’ refers in its title to a cold north wind, which appears to cause a landscape to hunker down in this expressive ink on paper artwork. (On view at Paula Cooper Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 3rd). Beatrice Caracciolo, Tramontana, water soluble ink on paper, 58 x 65 x 1 inches, 2017.

Though each painting in his first solo show at DC Moore Gallery is based on the torso of an eccentrically outfitted individual, Michael Stamm’s new paintings are remarkable diverse and inventive. Inspired by meetings with his therapist – with whom he avoided eye contact – Stamm’s headless characters offer enticing sartorial clues to identity. Here, the subject’s sweater contrasts a mountainous landscape above with licking flames below, connected by the French emblem translated, ‘it is…

Though each painting in his first solo show at DC Moore Gallery is based on the torso of an eccentrically outfitted individual, Michael Stamm’s new paintings are remarkable diverse and inventive. Inspired by meetings with his therapist – with whom he avoided eye contact – Stamm’s headless characters offer enticing sartorial clues to identity. Here, the subject’s sweater contrasts a mountainous landscape above with licking flames below, connected by the French emblem translated, ‘it is…

Kiyoshi Nakagami’s otherworldly abstractions, dramatically contrasting light and dark and rendered in pigment and gold dust, suggest a moment of cosmic creation or the beginning of an alien encounter. Scale and subject matter are hard to discern but the impact of Nakagami’s meticulously laid gold lines is profound. (On view at Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallery in Chelsea at the gallery’s temporary location on 19th Street). Kiyoshi Nakagami, detail of Untitled, pigment and gold dust on linen, 72…

Kiyoshi Nakagami’s otherworldly abstractions, dramatically contrasting light and dark and rendered in pigment and gold dust, suggest a moment of cosmic creation or the beginning of an alien encounter. Scale and subject matter are hard to discern but the impact of Nakagami’s meticulously laid gold lines is profound. (On view at Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallery in Chelsea at the gallery’s temporary location on 19th Street). Kiyoshi Nakagami, detail of Untitled, pigment and gold dust on linen, 72…

What can a painting do that a photograph can’t? Carla Klein’s latest paintings, created from photos taken on visits to European greenhouses, set themselves apart by making familiar spaces seem strange. Frames and panels in the background look excessive, as if new spaces were propagating along with the plants. (On view at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery through Feb 15th). Carla Klein, Untitled, oil on canvas, 59 x 106 ¼ x 1 inches, oil on canvas, 2017.

What can a painting do that a photograph can’t? Carla Klein’s latest paintings, created from photos taken on visits to European greenhouses, set themselves apart by making familiar spaces seem strange. Frames and panels in the background look excessive, as if new spaces were propagating along with the plants. (On view at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery through Feb 15th). Carla Klein, Untitled, oil on canvas, 59 x 106 ¼ x 1 inches, oil on canvas, 2017.

Celebration is a synonym for freedom in Odili Donald Odita’s vibrant abstract paintings, canvases that act with joyous vitality against forces that would quiet and crush identity. (On view at Jack Shainman Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 10th). Odili Donald Odita, Burning Sun, acrylic on canvas, 92 x 70 x 1 5/8 inches, 2017.

Celebration is a synonym for freedom in Odili Donald Odita’s vibrant abstract paintings, canvases that act with joyous vitality against forces that would quiet and crush identity. (On view at Jack Shainman Gallery in Chelsea through Feb 10th). Odili Donald Odita, Burning Sun, acrylic on canvas, 92 x 70 x 1 5/8 inches, 2017.

The visionary landscapes of Joseph Yoakum (1890-1972) and Robyn O’Neil (b. 1977) at Susan Inglett Gallery are Spartan and stylized, turning familiar natural forms of mountains, trees and more into apocalyptic omens. In this detail of a drawing by O’Neil, America’s national bird dominates a huddled crowd and an inhospitable landscape. (On view in Chelsea through Jan 27th). Robyn O’Neil, detail of The Everywhere Citadel, graphite on paper, 38 ½ x 60 ¼ inches, 2016.

The visionary landscapes of Joseph Yoakum (1890-1972) and Robyn O’Neil (b. 1977) at Susan Inglett Gallery are Spartan and stylized, turning familiar natural forms of mountains, trees and more into apocalyptic omens. In this detail of a drawing by O’Neil, America’s national bird dominates a huddled crowd and an inhospitable landscape. (On view in Chelsea through Jan 27th). Robyn O’Neil, detail of The Everywhere Citadel, graphite on paper, 38 ½ x 60 ¼ inches, 2016.

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