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Learn all about Harriet Tubman in this online exhibit.

Harriet Tubman - Google Arts & Culture

google.com

African women were involuntary immigrants to Jamestown. The privateer White Lion brought “20 and odd Negroes” in 1619. The 1620 census listed 17 African females among the settlement’s 928 residents. Over the ensuing centuries, the mingling of people from different cultures, classes, and conditions of servitude led to the development of America's distinctive culture.#womenshistory

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google.com

“Brave Bessie” Coleman became the world’s first female African American licensed pilot. #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

“The Motorcycle Queen of Miami” Bessie Stringfield loved riding so much that she would drop a penny on a map and ride to wherever it landed. #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Bessie Smith as one of the greatest blues singers of the twentieth century #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Harriet Jacobs worked with Contraband during the Civil War in Alexandria, VA. #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Julia Wilbur and Harriet Jacobs helped African Americans during the Civil War #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Mary Church Terrell, (1863 – 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first black women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations, including the National Association of Colored Women, and worked for civil rights and suffrage. Active in the Republican Party, she was president of the Women's Republican League during W. G. Harding's 1920 presidential campaign and the first election in which all American women were given the right to vote.

Mary Church Terrell Biography - Facts, Birthday, Life Story

biography.com

Claudette Colvin was arrested for the exact same thing as Rosa Parks and she was just 15 years old. #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) was an educator, civil rights activist, and political advisor to multiple US presidents. #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, one of the earliest professional female blues singers #womenshistory

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nwhm.org

Ruby was the only African American student to attend William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans #womenshistory

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Dr. Eliza Ann Grier. Born a slave she became the first African American to practice medicine in Georgia

Changing the Face of Medicine | Dr. Eliza Ann Grier

nlm.nih.gov

Dr. Jane Cooke Wright (November 30, 1919 - February 19, 2013) was a physician specializing in cancer research and treatment, as was her father, Dr. Louis Tomkins Wright. She was a pioneer in the use of chemotherapy, especially in breast and skin cancers. She was director of cancer centers at Harlem Hospital and Bellevue, and served on the National Cancer Advisory Council. #TodayInBlackHistory

Changing the Face of Medicine | Dr. Jane Cooke Wright

nlm.nih.gov

Howard University students photographed in their dorm by LIFE magazine in November 18, 1946 issue, page 111.

LIFE - Google Books

books.google.com

Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916) was an African American scientist that would be responsible for creating an injectable treatment for Leprosy.

colorful-history: Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916)...

lord-kitschener.tumblr.com

On April 23, 2015, Loretta Lynch became the first African American woman to hold the contries highest law enforcement position as U.S. Attorney General

Loretta Lynch confirmed as US attorney general

aljazeera.com

On November 16, 2004: President George W. Bush nominated Condoleezza Rice to replace Colin Powell as secretary of state. Both were the first African-American man and woman at the position.

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National Women's History Museum

Ida B. Wells fought hard to shed light on the racism that still existed in the country after abolition. While living in Memphis, Tennessee, Wells wrote many essays on the terrible treatment of freed African Americans. This editorial focused on the lynching of three men that occurred in Memphis in 1892.

Primary Sources

crusadeforthevote.squarespace.com

Ruby Bridges - then and now

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National Women's History Museum

May Edward chin, daughter of the housekeeper for the Tiffany family of Tiffany Jewelry, was educated along with the employers children. Though she never got a high school diploma, she managed to obtain a medical degree and opened a practice serving the underserved and focusing on terminal illnesses like cancer. No hospital would hire her because of her race. | nwhm.org | National Women's History Museum | #WomensHistory #MayEdwardChin #BlackWomen #BlackHistory

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National Women's History Museum

Journalist Ida B. Wells was an avid suffragist and an early Civil Rights leader, who used the power of the pen to challenge racial & sexual discrimination. In 1892, Wells published “Southern Horrors: Lynch Laws in All Its Phases” a scathing exposé of lynching practices. In retaliation for her articles, a mob destroyed her Memphis printing press, and after numerous threats to her life, Wells moved to Chicago to continue her anti-lynching campaign. | nwhm.org | National Women's History Museum

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huffingtonpost.com

Congresswoman Barbara Jordan’s incisive questioning during the Nixon impeachment trials earned her nationwide respect. Her work was recognized when, in 1976, she was invited to be the first African-American and the first woman to deliver the keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention. | nwhm.org | National Women's History Museum | #WomensHistory #BarbaraJordan #BlackWomen #BlackHistory

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projectblackman.com

In 1775, the United States Postal Service was established and we’re highlighting Mary Fields (A.K.A. “Stagecoach Mary”). Fields was the first African-American woman mail carrier in the United States! She was the second American woman to work for USPS. Born a slave in Tennessee, Fields migrated west shortly after the Civil War. She was hired as a mail carrier in Montana in 1895. | nwhm.org | National Women's History Museum | #WomensHistory #MaryFields #BlackHistory #BlackWomen

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onlyinyourstate.com

On March 27, 1961, four female and five male Tougaloo College students, known as the Tougaloo Nine organized a read-in at the Jackson Municipal Library. After the group began to study in the whites only library, a staff member called the police and the nine students were arrested and jailed. Their actions helped launch Mississippi’s civil rights movement. Pictured: Janice Jackson, Evelyn Pierce, and Ethel Sawyer being arrested. nwhm.org | #WomensHistory #TougalooNine #BlackHistory

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