African women were involuntary immigrants to Jamestown. The privateer White Lion brought “20 and odd Negroes” in 1619. The 1620 census listed 17 African females among the settlement’s 928 residents. Over the ensuing centuries, the mingling of people from different cultures, classes, and conditions of servitude led to the development of America's distinctive culture.#womenshistory

African women were involuntary immigrants to Jamestown. The privateer White Lion brought “20 and odd Negroes” in 1619. The 1620 census listed 17 African females among the settlement’s 928 residents. Over the ensuing centuries, the mingling of people from different cultures, classes, and conditions of servitude led to the development of America's distinctive culture.#womenshistory

“Brave Bessie” Coleman became the world’s first female African American licensed pilot. #womenshistory

“Brave Bessie” Coleman became the world’s first female African American licensed pilot. #womenshistory

“The Motorcycle Queen of Miami” Bessie Stringfield loved riding so much that she would drop a penny on a map and ride to wherever it landed. #womenshistory

“The Motorcycle Queen of Miami” Bessie Stringfield loved riding so much that she would drop a penny on a map and ride to wherever it landed. #womenshistory

Bessie Smith as one of the greatest blues singers of the twentieth century #womenshistory

Bessie Smith as one of the greatest blues singers of the twentieth century #womenshistory

Harriet Jacobs worked with Contraband during the Civil War in Alexandria, VA. #womenshistory

Harriet Jacobs worked with Contraband during the Civil War in Alexandria, VA. #womenshistory

Julia Wilbur and Harriet Jacobs helped African Americans during the Civil War #womenshistory

Julia Wilbur and Harriet Jacobs helped African Americans during the Civil War #womenshistory

Mary Church Terrell, (1863 – 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first black women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations, including the National Association of Colored Women, and worked for civil rights and suffrage. Active in the Republican Party, she was president of the Women's Republican League during W. G. Harding's 1920 presidential campaign and the first election in which all American women were given the right to vote.

Mary Church Terrell, (1863 – 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first black women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations, including the National Association of Colored Women, and worked for civil rights and suffrage. Active in the Republican Party, she was president of the Women's Republican League during W. G. Harding's 1920 presidential campaign and the first election in which all American women were given the right to vote.

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