There’s no cream in this wonderfully summery pasta dish, just a luscious sauce made from puréed fresh corn and sweet sautéed scallions, along with Parmesan for depth and red chile flakes for a contrasting bite. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Creamy Corn Pasta With Basil

NYT Cooking: There’s no cream in this wonderfully summery pasta dish, just a luscious sauce made from puréed fresh corn and sweet sautéed scallions, along with Parmesan for depth and red chile flakes for a contrasting bite. Be sure to add the lemon juice

Here’s a simple bright dish that’s nearly effortless to put together. You make a sort of salad-like relish with onion, cucumber and golden beet, seasoned with ginger and lime juice. Once the scallops are grilled, you spoon the relish over and drizzle with fruity olive oil, along with a shower of chopped sweet herbs. Done and done. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Grilled Sea Scallops With Yellow Beets, Cucumbers and Lime

Grilled Sea Scallops With Yellow Beets, Cucumbers and Lime - NYT Cooking

This straight-from-the-garden vegetable salad is the essence of summer on a plate. It’s very easy to make, but you’ll need to buy sweet young corn, tender enough to eat raw, as well as perfectly ripe avocados and the freshest cucumbers. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Corn, Avocado and Cucumber Salad

Corn, Avocado and Cucumber Salad - NYT Cooking: This straight-from-the-garden vegetable salad is the essence of summer on a plate.

Although burrata is inarguably the star of this stunning summery salad, roasted eggplant, cherry tomatoes and Romano beans add a brilliant mix of colors, textures and flavors to the creamy mozzarella. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Burrata With Romano Beans and Roasted Eggplant

NYT Cooking: Although burrata is inarguably the star of this stunning summery salad, roasted eggplant, cherry tomatoes and Romano beans add a brilliant mix of colors, textures and flavors to the creamy mozzarella. The eggplant is soft and rich

Cobbler is an irresistible summer treat, with its combination of bubbling fruit and golden biscuits. This version uses sweet, nutty hazelnut flour in the biscuits, which bake up crunchy on the outside and tender in the middle. (Photo: Jim Wilson/The New York Times)

Peach and Blueberry Cobbler With Hazelnut Biscuits

NYT Cooking: Cobbler is an irresistible summer treat, with its combination of bubbling fruit and golden biscuits. This version uses sweet, nutty hazelnut flour in the biscuits, which bake up crunchy on the outside and tender in the middle. To swap whole h

Cobbler is an irresistible summer treat, with its combination of bubbling fruit and golden biscuits. This version uses sweet, nutty hazelnut flour in the biscuits, which bake up crunchy on the outside and tender in the middle. (Photo: Jim Wilson/The New York Times)

Peach and Blueberry Cobbler With Hazelnut Biscuits

Cobbler is an irresistible summer treat, with its combination of bubbling fruit and golden biscuits. This version uses sweet, nutty hazelnut flour in the biscuits, which bake up crunchy on the outside and tender in the middle. (Photo: Jim Wilson/The New Y

Serve this as a light meal or a first course, with grilled or toasted country bread, perhaps smeared with a little of the garlic confit left over from making the garlic oil. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Burrata With Romano Beans and Roasted Eggplant

NYT Cooking: Although burrata is inarguably the star of this stunning summery salad, roasted eggplant, cherry tomatoes and Romano beans add a brilliant mix of colors, textures and flavors to the creamy mozzarella. The eggplant is soft and rich

Using blanched chard, placed into ramekins, is a foundation for a Greek-style pie. Blanched briefly, the large veiny leaves made perfect wrappers for the little pies. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Chard-Wrapped Greek Yogurt Pies

These little Greek-style pies are traditionally wrapped in grape leaves, but chard leaves make a fine alternative Served warm, the texture is akin to a fresh cheese, perfumed with dill, mint and olive oil.

The markets are still teeming with glorious summer vegetables. But the changing weather demands something a little different. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

A Couscous for the (Not Quite) End of Summer

Summer Vegetable Couscous With Spicy Pesto - NYT Cooking: Hearty but not heavy. If you are short on time, you can skip Step 1 — cooking the dried chickpeas — and use 2 cups canned chickpeas in.

Choose freshly picked corn with small, sweet, tender kernels. If that is not available, use cooked kernels for this salad. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

The Key to a Superior Salad

Choose freshly picked corn with small, sweet, tender kernels. If that is not available, use cooked kernels for this salad. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

The photogenic tart will make you look like a pastry chef, though it's no more difficult than baking a pie. A sweet tart crust is layered with almond cream, fig jam (homemade is nice, but store-bought works well, too) and fresh figs. (Photo: Jessica Emily Marx for The New York Times)

Fresh Fig Tart

The photogenic tart will make you look like a pastry chef, though it's no more…

Blending corn kernels not only gives you a sweet and smooth purée to use in soups, fritters and cornbread, but it also brings out the kernel’s starchier nature. And this can be a good thing, especially when it comes to making a sweet summery sauce for pasta. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

To Get the Most Out of Corn Season, Reach for Your Blender

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Summer Vegetable Couscous With Spicy Pesto

Hearty but not heavy, this stew uses lots of summer vegetables available from the farmers' market. It’s a little complicated to put together, but both the vegetable stew and the couscous can be made in advance, even a day ahead, without suffering. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Tomatoes make for a sweet and juicy contrast to the burrata. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Consider This Permission to Eat Burrata for Dinner

Tomatoes make for a sweet and juicy contrast to the burrata. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

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