On weekends, Orwasher’s in Manhattan makes an old-school kornbroyt, a slow-risen, rougher-textured bread with more of the whole rye grain. Kornbroyt is prized by Jewish bread aficionados because in this era of puffy, sweet breads and bagels, it still has the pull and tang of tradition. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

Rye, a Grain With Ancient Roots, Is Rising Again

On weekends, Orwasher’s in Manhattan makes an old-school kornbroyt, a slow-risen, rougher-textured bread with more of the whole rye grain. Kornbroyt is prized by Jewish bread aficionados because in this era of puffy, sweet breads and bagels, it still has the pull and tang of tradition. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

Rye, like barley and oats, is a grain that thrives in cold and wet weather. Here, four different rye loaves at the restaurant High Street on Hudson. (Photo: Danny Ghitis for The New York Times)

Rye, a Grain With Ancient Roots, Is Rising Again

Rye, like barley and oats, is a grain that thrives in cold and wet weather. Here, four different rye loaves at the restaurant High Street on Hudson. (Photo: Danny Ghitis for The New York Times)

“Rugbrod is like wine in France, or olive oil in Italy,” says Claus Meyer, the owner of Great Northern Food Hall and several new Nordic food enterprises in New York. “It is more than food. It is history. It is culture, and agriculture.” (Photo: Francesco Sapienza for The New York Times)

Rye, a Grain With Ancient Roots, Is Rising Again

“Rugbrod is like wine in France, or olive oil in Italy,” says Claus Meyer, the owner of Great Northern Food Hall and several new Nordic food enterprises in New York. “It is more than food. It is history. It is culture, and agriculture.” (Photo: Francesco Sapienza for The New York Times)

Jewish rye bread, like the bagel, is in a constant state of peril, with ever fewer traditional bakeries making it. One bulwark is Orwasher’s in Manhattan, where 10-pound loaves of sissel rye are baked daily, just as they have been since 1916, when the bakery was founded in Yorkville. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

Rye, a Grain With Ancient Roots, Is Rising Again

Jewish rye bread, like the bagel, is in a constant state of peril, with ever fewer traditional bakeries making it. One bulwark is Orwasher’s in Manhattan, where 10-pound loaves of sissel rye are baked daily, just as they have been since 1916, when the bakery was founded in Yorkville. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

For novice challah makers, the braid can seem like the hardest part of the bread recipe. Follow these simple steps to make a six-strand challah round, and watch a video on making the classic three-strand braided loaf. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

How to Braid Challah Bread

For novice challah makers, the braid can seem like the hardest part of the bread recipe. Follow these simple steps to make a six-strand challah round, and watch a video on making the classic three-strand braided loaf. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Made with extra-virgin olive oil, this challah is especially rich and complex tasting. A little bit of grated citrus zest, if you choose to use it, adds a welcome brightness to the soft, slightly sweet loaf, which is also flavored with orange juice. If you’d prefer a more classic challah, substitute a neutral oil such as safflower or grapeseed for the olive oil and leave out the zest. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Olive Oil Challah

Made with extra-virgin olive oil, this challah is especially rich and complex tasting. A little bit of grated citrus zest, if you choose to use it, adds a welcome brightness to the soft, slightly sweet loaf, which is also flavored with orange juice. If you’d prefer a more classic challah, substitute a neutral oil such as safflower or grapeseed for the olive oil and leave out the zest. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Olive oil makes makes challah, that beloved eggy, rich bread even more delectable. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

The Golden Secret to Better Challah

Olive oil makes makes challah, that beloved eggy, rich bread even more delectable. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

The beauty of a baked French toast casserole is that you can prepare it entirely in advance, usually the night before you want to serve it, then pop it into the oven about 45 minutes before you’re ready to eat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Baked French Toast With Oat Crumble Topping

The beauty of a baked French toast casserole is that you can prepare it entirely in advance, usually the night before you want to serve it, then pop it into the oven about 45 minutes before you’re ready to eat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

This recipe for the traditional Venezuelan Christmas bread comes from Martha Beltrán in Austin, Tex., who brought the recipe with her when she moved to the U.S. Ms. Beltrán always starts the bread the day before she serves it, laminating it with butter three times before rolling it up with ham, bacon, olives and pimentos. The process can be long, but the dough can be left in the fridge for a flexible and forgiving amount of time, even overnight. (Photo: Melina Hammer for NYT)

This recipe for the traditional Venezuelan Christmas bread comes from Martha Beltrán in Austin, Tex., who brought the recipe with her when she moved to the U.S. Ms. Beltrán always starts the bread the day before she serves it, laminating it with butter three times before rolling it up with ham, bacon, olives and pimentos. The process can be long, but the dough can be left in the fridge for a flexible and forgiving amount of time, even overnight. (Photo: Melina Hammer for NYT)

A filling sweetened with cinnamon sugar is rolled into the dough. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

The Pecan Steps Off the Pie Plate

A filling sweetened with cinnamon sugar is rolled into the dough. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

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