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Easter Dinner

Main courses, sides and desserts for your Easter celebration.


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Easter Dinner

Easter Dinner

  • 61 Pins

What do you serve when you serve drinks? The general consensus is something crisp, salty and delicious. (In France, Champagne with potato chips is considered the perfect pairing.) Cheese wafers and cheese straws are always crowd pleasers. They’re easy to prepare—basically, it’s flaky pastry dough with grated cheese mixed in—and variations are endless. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

The lush combination of honey and butter is a classic for biscuits, but adding crunchy salt is a modern touch that makes this topping sing. The chef Joe Dobias uses alaea red salt from Hawaii for color contrast, but any large-grained sea salt will work. If using other salts, you may need less — add sparingly and taste as you go. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Jim Lahey’s original recipe was immediately and wildly popular. How many novices it attracted to bread baking is anyone’s guess. But certainly there were plenty of existing bread bakers who excitedly tried it, liked it and immediately set about trying to improve it. This is an attempt to cut the start-to-finish time down to a few hours, rather than the original 14 to 20 hours' rising time. The solution is simple: use more yeast. (Photo: The New York Times)

For special occasions in Morocco, a whole lamb is turned on a spit over coals for hours, until the exterior is browned and crisp, with tender juicy meat within. Paula Wolfert, the great American authority on Moroccan food, gives this slow-roasting method for achieving similar delicious results in a home oven. (Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

This ice cream is chock-full of sweet bits, but with enough satiny frozen custard to savor between the chunks. To keep the rhubarb from freezing into tooth-breaking fruity ice cubes, stew it with plenty of sugar, which keeps the fruit soft. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Crostata With Warm Salad of Garden Greens and Weeds. Click the link to get the complete recipe at NYTCooking.com. (Photo: Raymond Meier for The New York Times)

A hot-cross bun is essentially what the English call a Chelsea bun, a confection sold all year. The difference is that for Good Friday, a cross is traced on the top of the bun. Unlike their American counterparts who use frosting, English bakers create the cross by slashing the dough or by laying strips of pastry across the top of the bun. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Carrots don’t have to be boring or lackluster. Roasting, which captures the carrots’ natural sweetness, is emphasized here with the aromatic sweetness of coconut oil. Cilantro, mint, jalapeño and lime ensure there nothing one-dimensional about this dish at all. Chop the herbs just before serving for the freshest flavor. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

To celebrate the end of winter, French cooks make navarin printanier, a lamb stew. Instead of serving it with potatoes, parsnips or other winter root vegetables, this colorful stew is brimming with fresh spring produce, a mixture of small vegetables like baby turnips, fava beans and scallions. To keep it on the lighter side, use a splash of white wine instead of red. Finish with peas or asparagus tips, cooked briefly, if they are available. The stew can be made a day ahead, but the vegetables should be freshly cooked before serving. (Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

This combination of miso and butter is natural and delicious, too. Miso butter looks a little like cake frosting and is just as easy to lick off the fingers. With the egg yolk dripping onto the butter and the asparagus spears dipped into the eggy, miso slurry, you're looking at a four-star dish at a neighborhood restaurant — or at home. (Photo: Ruby Washington/The New York Times)

People travel long distances to eat Regina Charboneau’s biscuits. She built a blues club in San Francisco, called Biscuits and Blues, on their reputation. And in her hometown, Natchez, Miss., her biscuits are considered the best. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Holiday Bread for Easter. Click the link to read David Tanis's complete recipe. (Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

How to make a bunny cake for your Easter dinner. (Photos: Margaux Laskey/The New York Times)

Purée de Pommes de Terre à la Truffe. Click the link for the complete recipe. (Photo: Mitchell Feinberg for The New York Times)

Scalloped Keuka Gold Potatoes. Click the link to get the complete recipe from NYTCooking.com. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

If you haven't cooked a whole leg of lamb before, here is the place to start. This is not a revolutionary recipe, but slathering on butter and (take our word for it) anchovies makes this version truly essential. It is excellent for the Easter feast — lamb has ancient associations with springtime, and it pairs well with sharp spring vegetables like asparagus, dandelion greens and artichokes. (Photo: Melina Hammer for The New York Times)

The Best Roast Lamb for Your Easter Feast (Photo: Melina Hammer for The New York Times)

A shower of lemon zest and black mustard seeds on a fast sauté of hashed brussels sprouts makes a traditional side dish with unexpected, bright flavors. Slice the sprouts a day or so before (a food processor makes it easy) and refrigerate until it's time to prepare them. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

As enjoyable as pounding a garlic clove or olive may be, probably the most satisfying flat food to prepare is Susan Spungen’s potato “tostones.” You steam baby potatoes until they’re just tender, let them cool enough to be handled, then press them between your palms until they flatten a bit and you hear their skins begin to snap. Next, you heat up some oil in a skillet and fry the potatoes until they’re nice and brown on their flat sides. (Photo: Melina Hammer for The New York Times)

In this simple side dish, carrots and parsnips are simmered in a few pats of butter and a splash of water until tender, then hit with a dash of lemon juice and a sprinkling of fresh herbs. Use the smallest carrots and parsnips you can find; the smaller, the sweeter. (Photo: Melina Hammer for The New York Times)

I enjoy wild mushrooms, but I happen to like ordinary white button mushrooms, too; the cultivated kind, the ones that are also called champignons de Paris (especially by the French). I suppose they are considered pedestrian in foodie circles, and that’s a pity. This recipe makes great use of them. It’s a simple one, with only a few ingredients: a bit of butter, a handful of sweet herbs and some tangy crème fraîche. Try it as an easy side dish or over noodles. (Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

Carrots don’t have to be boring or lackluster. Roasting, which captures the carrots’ natural sweetness, is emphasized here with the aromatic sweetness of coconut oil. Cilantro, mint, jalapeño and lime ensure there nothing one-dimensional about this dish at all. Chop the herbs just before serving for the freshest flavor. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Give commonplace cauliflower an upgrade and it becomes holiday fare. Take a classic Venetian approach by using a mixture of sweet spices. Caramelized onions, saffron and cinnamon build the fragrant foundation, along with fennel and coriander seeds. Currants, golden raisins and pine nuts add complexity. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Though we think of them as part of a crisp raw crudité platter, radishes are delicious cooked. Cooked radishes taste like young turnips, which makes sense, since they are related botanically. Simple to cook, they should be quickly simmered in a small amount of water with a knob of good butter and a little salt. Red radishes turn a dainty pink. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

From lamb to asparagus to homemade Peeps, here’s what to cook on Easter Sunday. (And a few ideas for all of those hard-boiled eggs.) (Photo: The New York Times)