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    Father's Day

    Forget the "World's Greatest Dad" t-shirt. Give him ribs -- or a rib-sticking salad -- instead.

    Father's Day

    • 48 Pins

    On a pilot father's brushes with death and lessons on life: "He taught me not to hold on to anything too tightly - especially something I love." (Illustration: Credit Shimrit Elkanati)

    Op-Ed writer David Shipley's father's ties deserved a second chance. So he wore them and kept a diary of ties, passed down from father to son. (Illustration: Leanne Shapton)

    This is essentially a bacon cheeseburger in meatball form. The cooked steak should be diced into small bites, not ground, for the best texture. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

    This drink is a little miracle in liquid prestidigitation: five ingredients (three of them alcoholic) getting together to assume the guise of an innocent cherry cola. (Photo: Peter DaSilva for The New York Times)

    Adapted from Perry Hendrix, the chef de cuisine at the acclaimed restaurant Avec in Chicago, these intensely flavored mouthfuls are meaty, spicy and sweet all at once. You could serve them as an appetizer, sitting in a pool of silky sauce, but they could also work as finger food, with the sauce set aside for dipping. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

    For casual entertaining, the tapas experience translates well to the small home kitchen. One delicious hot tapas classic easily made at home is called pinchos Moruños, or Moorish skewers, essentially small kebabs of pork marinated in Arabic (Moorish) spices and grilled, usually on a hot steel plancha. (Photo: Jim Wilson/The New York Times)

    No matter where you bake it, this particular apple pie recipe is a keeper. Gently spiced with cinnamon, tinged with brown sugar and loaded with apple butter, it’s as deeply flavored as an apple pie can be, all covered with a buttery wide-lattice top crust. (Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

    Kingsley Amis and Churchill could hardly stand the stuff, but a little extra vermouth goes a long way. (Photo: Victor Schrager for The New York Times)

    Cornmeal adds crunch and sweetness to these fluffy waffles, which are lightened with beaten egg whites If you’d prefer a little more fiber, you can substitute a third of the all-purpose flour with whole-wheat or rye flour. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

    This concoction and Internet sensation came to The Times from Jason Day and Aaron Chronister, who created it shortly before Christmas one year in Roeland Park, Kan. They modestly call it “the BBQ Sausage Recipe of all Recipes.” (Photo: Don Ipock for The New York Times)

    Thin enough to flash-fry but thick enough to let the sweet onion flavor shine through, these onion rings work well as a side dish but also are great as a stand-alone snack. (Photo: Amber Fouts for The New York Times)

    A spin on the old drink category of the flip — which involves the use of a whole egg — the Fade to Black illustrates the potential versatility of cocktails using beer. Rich, dessertlike and potent, this is that rare beast: an after-dinner beer cocktail. (Photo: Sasha Maslov for The New York Times)

    Roy Choi's carne asada — grilled meat — might raise eyebrows in Puebla and Laredo alike. There is mirin in the marinade and a lot of garlic. But there is purity to its expression of urban Southern California. This is a recipe to expand minds, a delicious take on a venerable classic. (Photo: Marcus Nilsson for The New York Times)

    This low-alcohol, post-dinner drink tastes a bit like a root beer float after the ice cream has melted. It is named after the Butter Festival that takes place every June in Mr. Bartels’s hometown, Reedsburg, Wis. If you have a butter cookie or vanilla wafer on hand, it makes a nice accompaniment. (Photo: Nancy Borowick for The New York Times)

    You sear these partly frozen rib steaks using a blowtorch and a cast-iron skillet. Once browned, you put the still-frozen steaks in a 200-degree oven for an hour. The charring gives them an alluring crust and tasty grilled flavor.

    Add a pop of color to dad's exercise routine with a bike ($875) from Ace Hotel's collaboration with Tokyobike. Options include green, blue, gold and orange.

    Is dad a bit of a prepster? Considering gifting him something from Vineyard Vines, which sells whale logo polo shirts ($70 to $80), slim-fit pastel pants ($99) and canvas belts ($50, or $78 for the one with the embroidered lacrosse sticks).

    Give dad an easy way to get up and go with one of the new crop of duffel bags like this one ($440), which has plenty of compartments, including one for shoes. and is available in olive, black and navy,

    Not only is the go-anywhere rubber watch strap sporty and unpretentious, it's also become a fashion statement. The Apple Watch Sport, top, goes for $349 to $399 and is gym-friendly, techy and colorful.

    Gold watches are having a moment. But if the sight of the shiny yellow material instantly has you thinking about a King Tut exhibit, consider giving your father a more subtle rose gold watch instead.

    Create the perfect shoe for dad with the Made to Order Driver, a customizable driving moccasin from Salvatore Ferragamo. Gray crocodile leather with a cherry-colored sole and metallic-blue hardware? White ostrich leather with polished gold hardware? A personalized monogram? With more than 100 combinations available, chances of pleasing even the pickiest dads are pretty good.

    An overstuffed, brick-sized wallet? Not cute. Help dad streamline his look with a sleek billfold.

    Think it's time for dad to upgrade his work bag to something more stylish? Look to high-end backpacks for inspiration.

    The classic combination of cherries and almonds is irresistible. For this tart, whole pitted cherries are baked in a rich almond batter called frangipane. Softly whipped cream, crème fraîche or vanilla ice cream make nice accompaniments. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

    This delectable hazelnut tart is adapted from a recipe by the pastry chef Jacquy Pfeiffer, who founded the French Pastry School in Chicago. It is best eaten the day it is made.