Father's Day

Forget the "World's Greatest Dad" t-shirt. Give him ribs -- or a rib-sticking salad -- instead.
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Through all the breakfast fads, pancakes stand resolute, the definitive breakfast dish, something almost everyone loves and all of us should master. They are the indulgent heroes of the breakfast table: eggy, salty and just this side of sweet. There may have been struggles with burned bottoms and raw interiors in your past, but with a well-made batter and some practice with your stove, you can achieve pancake perfection. (Photos: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

This is just one of those desserts that seem, on the page as on the plate, to be labor-intensive and tricky, but in fact are as simple to make as they are gratifying to eat. For one thing, you can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for a good three days without coming to any harm. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

This banana bread from Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything" is really something special. One-fourth of the flour is whole wheat, which contributes a kind of depth you’d miss if it weren’t there. There are walnuts — not unusual, but again, you’d miss them if they weren’t there. And the key, secret ingredient, is coconut. (Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Behold! An ode to summer in cake form. In this towering dessert from the food stylist and cookbook author Susan Spungen, crackly yet tender layers of almond cake are layered with mounds of fresh berries and a rich filling of mascarpone and crème fraîche. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

You can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for a good three days without coming to any harm. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

At some point Dad, like America, changed. He found peace enough with who I am to insist on introducing my partner, Tom, to his friends at the golf club. Peace enough to compliment me on articles of mine that use the same three-letter word that once chased him off. Read the rest of Frank Bruni's beautiful story of his father's journey. (Illustration: Ben Wiseman)

Read Frank Bruni's realization about powerful fathers when he interviewed George W. Bush in Kennebunkport. (Illustration: Ben Wiseman)

Theres a new generation of dads, poignantly visible in politics, sports and books. "He wrestles soulfully with what kind of father he is and means to be. He weeps. He trembles." Frank Bruni writes about the gentler approach of modern dads in his column.

This Op-Ed writer swears he is a more loving, attentive and patient father when he take my medication as prescribed. Perhaps this isn’t surprising. As anyone who inhaled during college can attest, cannabis enhances the ability to perceive beauty, complexity and novelty in otherwise mundane things while simultaneously locking you into a prolonged state of rapt attention. Happy Father's Day! (Illustration: Kris Mukai)

Theres a new generation of dads, poignantly visible in politics, sports and books. "He wrestles soulfully with what kind of father he is and means to be. He weeps. He trembles." Frank Bruni writes about the gentler approach of modern dads in his column.

If you are a parent, you can employ inshallah (Arabic phrase meaning "god willing,") to either defer or subtly crush the desires of young children. Boy: “Father, will we go to Toys ‘R’ Us later today?” Father: “Yes. Inshallah.” Translation: “There is no way we’re going to Toys ‘R’ Us. I’m exhausted. Play with the neighbor’s toys. Here, play with this staple remover. That’s fun, isn’t it?” (Illustration: Jordan Awan)

With pliant skins surrounding a rich mash of potatoes and cheese, Julia Hlinka’s pierogies are the epitome of satisfying northern Slovakian farm food. Instead of the traditional sheep's cheese, she uses American cheese — a reminder of her move to the United States in the 60s — which melts into the potatoes. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

A pliant, tender skin gives way to a smooth, creamy mash of potatoes, delivering the gut-level satisfaction of starch on starch. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

This collection of intense fruit squares, a confection the French call pâtes de fruits, is from Casey Hickey, a candymaker and chocolatier based in Charlotte, N.C., who studied in Paris. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

What would the world would be like if men commented on each others Facebooks like women? Click the jumpsuited bros for more: “Love the natural look, Mark. Like you didn’t spend any time getting ready in the morning, but you’re flawless anyway.” (Illustration: Oscar Bolton Green)

The pastrami at Hobby’s, which gets its meat from Desola Provisions in the Bronx. The owners insist on the navel cut, which they boil and steam after the shipment arrives. “Only then does it become Hobby’s pastrami,” Marc Brummer said. (Photo: Bryan Anselm for The New York Times)

The roast duck at Fish & Game, another of Zak Pelaccio’s restaurants in Hudson, N.Y. (Photo: Preston Schlebusch for The New York Times)

You could simply rub the pork belly with salt, and seven days later roast it and call it bacon. But the real art is in adding elements of savory or sweet to create an original flavor. (Photo: Brendan Hoffman for NYT)

Consider using this cured duck, adapted from "Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing," by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn, as a garnish for salad; as a canapé, on a bit of toasted bread spread with Dijon mustard; or sautéed like pancetta. (Photo: Benjamin Norman for The New York Times)

This large, fluffy pancake is excellent for breakfast, brunch, lunch and dessert any time of year. And it comes together in about five blessed minutes. Just dump all of the ingredients into a blender, give it a good whirl, pour it into a heated skillet sizzling with butter, and pop it into the oven. Twenty-five minutes later? Bliss. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Bacon’s flavor, as with that of any charcuterie, directly reflects the meat that is being cured, so start with great pork belly from a butcher or a farmer. Ideally, the cut will be squared off and evenly thick. (Photo: Brendan Hoffman for NYT)

This is a good first foray into curing because the process is simple and relatively quick and the reward considerable. Thanks to the beets, the color on the outside of the salmon is a deep, rich fuchsia. And don't be afraid to use fresh horseradish if you can find it; just be careful. (Photo: Benjamin Norman for The New York Times)

Pickled onion hush puppies with pimento cheese queso and andouille sausage at the Delta Bistropub. (Photo: Robert Rausch for The New York Times)

There’s a new generation of dads, poignantly visible in politics, sports and books. "He wrestles soulfully with what kind of father he is and means to be. He weeps. He trembles." Frank Bruni writes about the gentler approach of modern dads in his column. (Illustration: Ben Wiseman)

On a pilot father's brushes with death and lessons on life: "He taught me not to hold on to anything too tightly - especially something I love." (Illustration: Credit Shimrit Elkanati)