This is just one of those desserts that seem, on the page as on the plate, to be labor-intensive and tricky, but in fact are as simple to make as they are gratifying to eat. For one thing, you can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for a good three days without coming to any harm. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Crêpes Suzette

You can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for three days

This banana bread from Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything" is really something special. One-fourth of the flour is whole wheat, which contributes a kind of depth you’d miss if it weren’t there. There are walnuts — not unusual, but again, you’d miss them if they weren’t there. And the key, secret ingredient, is coconut. (Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Mark Bittman’s Banana Bread

Mark Bittman’s Banana Bread Recipe - NYT Cooking. I made this with four bananas- recommend. Good cycling or hiking food.

Through all the breakfast fads, pancakes stand resolute, the definitive breakfast dish, something almost everyone loves and all of us should master. They are the indulgent heroes of the breakfast table: eggy, salty and just this side of sweet. There may have been struggles with burned bottoms and raw interiors in your past, but with a well-made batter and some practice with your stove, you can achieve pancake perfection. (Photos: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Perfect Buttermilk Pancakes

Through all the breakfast fads, pancakes stand resolute, the definitive breakfast dish, something almost everyone loves and all of us should master. They are the indulgent heroes of the breakfast tabl

Behold! An ode to summer in cake form. In this towering dessert from the food stylist and cookbook author Susan Spungen, crackly yet tender layers of almond cake are layered with mounds of fresh berries and a rich filling of mascarpone and crème fraîche. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Almond Berry Layer Cake

Behold An ode to summer in cake form In this towering dessert from the food stylist and cookbook author Susan Spungen, crumbly yet tender layers of almond cake are layered with mounds of fresh berries and a rich filling of mascarpone and crème fraîche

With pliant skins surrounding a rich mash of potatoes and cheese, Julia Hlinka’s pierogies are the epitome of satisfying northern Slovakian farm food. Instead of the traditional sheep's cheese, she uses American cheese — a reminder of her move to the United States in the 60s — which melts into the potatoes. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

Potato-Cheese Pierogies With Bacon

Here is a somewhat different take on lamb kebabs for the grill. The meat is bathed in a spicy-cool Asian marinade and threaded on skewers with whole scallions placed crosswise so all can be seared together. (Photo: Rikki Snyder for The New York Times)

Grilled Scallion Lamb

cut down on the dry spices in the marinade- gets too gummy on the lamb. needs work on the texture, but the flavor is very good.

You can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for a good three days without coming to any harm. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Crepes

You can make the crepes in advance; they could sit, piled between torn-off sheets of baking parchment and well wrapped in the refrigerator, for a good three days without coming to any harm. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

The cheese ball is a stalwart of the Midwest cocktail party, where it can be fashioned from processed Cheddar cheese and port wine, or pineapple and cream cheese. This recipe relies on the leftover ends of good cheese or even just one kind of good-quality, sharp cheese like Gruyère. (Photo: Jessica Emily Marx for The New York Times)

Bits and Pieces Party Cheese Ball

A pliant, tender skin gives way to a smooth, creamy mash of potatoes, delivering the gut-level satisfaction of starch on starch. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

How to Master Pierogies

A pliant, tender skin gives way to a smooth, creamy mash of potatoes, delivering the gut-level satisfaction of starch on starch. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

This recipe takes time, but can be made up to two days in advance. Give the ribs their final sear just before serving. (Photo: Sasha Maslov for The New York Times)

Seared Lamb Ribs With Spicy Yogurt Sauce

This recipe takes time, but can be made up to two days in advance. Give the ribs their final sear just before serving. (Photo: Sasha Maslov for The New York Times) - Foodie

This is a substantial baked frittata that feeds a small crowd. Filled with spicy Italian sausage, flavorful greens and four kinds of cheese, it tastes best at room temperature, and it's perfect for a weekend late breakfast or any time of day. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Hot Italian Sausage and Broccoli Rabe Frittata

This is a substantial baked frittata that feeds a small crowd Filled with spicy Italian sausage, flavorful greens and four kinds of cheese, it tastes best at room temperature, and it& perfect for a weekend late breakfast or any time of day.

Quibble all you like, but a clam pizza is the very best pizza in the world. (Photo: Gentl and Hyers for The New York Times)

Why Clam-Chowder Pizza Is the Best Kind

NYT Cooking: The clam pizza is thought to have been born in New Haven at Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana, in the middle of the last century, and has since made its way south to New York City. My recipe honors no one particular preparation but does pay homa

Tiki is no joke. It began in the early 1930s at Don’s Beachcomber Cafe, where, Martin Cate writes in his new book, “Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki,” the “entertainment was the space itself,” decked out in palm trees and other island-evoking ephemera. The Trader Vic’s franchise soon followed. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

Tiki’s Comeback

started in the early at Don’s Beachcomber Cafe. Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times.

The Clam in a Can is a spicy, beery riff on an oyster shooter. It also brings a michelada to my mind. Be sure to get your cans very clean and very cold before making the drinks. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

Clam in a Can

Jill Dobias, of the East Village restaurant Joe and Misses Doe, is a master of creative cocktails with irreverent names The Clam in a Can is her spicy, beery riff on an oyster shooter It also brings a michelada to my mind

Sous-vide beef prepared by Grant Crilly at ChefSteps in Seattle. (Photo: Stuart Isett for The New York Times)

Making Sous Vide Simplify Work for You

Sous-vide beef prepared by Grant Crilly at ChefSteps in Seattle. (Photo: Stuart Isett for The New York Times)

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