This showstopper of a dessert is everything traditional s'mores are – chocolatey, gooey, crunchy – in grown-up, travel-friendly pie form. It is not difficult to make, but it does take some time, so set aside a few hours to make and assemble all of the worthy parts. Ultimately, what you end up with is a chocolate pudding pie in a graham cracker crust, topped with a blanket of homemade marshmallow that's browned to perfection. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

This showstopper of a dessert is everything traditional s'mores are – chocolatey, gooey, crunchy – in grown-up, travel-friendly pie form. It is not difficult to make, but it does take some time, so set aside a few hours to make and assemble all of the worthy parts. Ultimately, what you end up with is a chocolate pudding pie in a graham cracker crust, topped with a blanket of homemade marshmallow that's browned to perfection. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Chicken parm – crisp chicken served with tomato sauce, draped in mozzarella and anointed with grated Parmesan, served perhaps on a hero roll or beside a tangle of pasta – is among the finest dishes of the Italian diaspora in America. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

Chicken parm – crisp chicken served with tomato sauce, draped in mozzarella and anointed with grated Parmesan, served perhaps on a hero roll or beside a tangle of pasta – is among the finest dishes of the Italian diaspora in America. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

These heavenly little bars, adapted from the Southern cookbook author Julia Reed, are a modern-day, perfect-for-a-picnic version of a traditional custard pie made from flour, cornmeal, sugar, eggs, butter and buttermilk. They are like lemon bars without the lip-puckering citrus: a blanket of egg-rich custard generously laced with vanilla atop a lightly salted, crumbly shortbread crust. (Photo: Lisa Nicklin for The New York Times)

These heavenly little bars, adapted from the Southern cookbook author Julia Reed, are a modern-day, perfect-for-a-picnic version of a traditional custard pie made from flour, cornmeal, sugar, eggs, butter and buttermilk. They are like lemon bars without the lip-puckering citrus: a blanket of egg-rich custard generously laced with vanilla atop a lightly salted, crumbly shortbread crust. (Photo: Lisa Nicklin for The New York Times)

Turkey burgers are much leaner than hamburgers, but they can be dry and dull. Moisten them by adding ketchup and a bit of grated onion to the ground turkey — or mayonnaise and a bit of mustard. The idea is to emphasize condiments, and keep the turkey moist. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Turkey burgers are much leaner than hamburgers, but they can be dry and dull. Moisten them by adding ketchup and a bit of grated onion to the ground turkey — or mayonnaise and a bit of mustard. The idea is to emphasize condiments, and keep the turkey moist. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

A shrimp burger is simply a cake of shrimp and seasonings served on a bun, with lettuce, tomato and tartar sauce. These concentrate the sweet essence of shellfish and complement it with semisweet seasonings like parsley, onion and celery. They are easy to prepare, and they bring the warmth of a summer beach picnic indoors. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

A shrimp burger is simply a cake of shrimp and seasonings served on a bun, with lettuce, tomato and tartar sauce. These concentrate the sweet essence of shellfish and complement it with semisweet seasonings like parsley, onion and celery. They are easy to prepare, and they bring the warmth of a summer beach picnic indoors. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Celebration cake. (Photo: Carol Sachs for The New York Times)

Revel in the Bounty of Spring, With a Feast From Yotam Ottolenghi

These little Greek-style pies are traditionally wrapped in grape leaves, but chard leaves make a fine alternative. Served warm, the texture is akin to a fresh cheese, perfumed with dill, mint and olive oil. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

These little Greek-style pies are traditionally wrapped in grape leaves, but chard leaves make a fine alternative. Served warm, the texture is akin to a fresh cheese, perfumed with dill, mint and olive oil. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Here is the hamburger you get in better taverns and bars, plump and juicy, with a thick char that gives way to tender, medium-rare meat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Here is the hamburger you get in better taverns and bars, plump and juicy, with a thick char that gives way to tender, medium-rare meat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Pork and fruit is a classic combination, and for good reason: The sweetness and tang of the fruit softens the gamy richness of the meat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Pork and fruit is a classic combination, and for good reason: The sweetness and tang of the fruit softens the gamy richness of the meat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

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