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In The Garden

Inspiration for your backyard, terrace, fire escape, window sill or kitchen herb collection, photographed for The New York Times.


In The Garden

  • 69 Pins

I’ve taken the dog out on her leash and rushed toward them, though her lunges and cries, like mine, only seem to amuse the deer before they reluctantly, elegantly and temporarily, move off. Continue reading this opinion essay at The New York Times. (Photo: Susan Stava for The New York Times)

Mayapples produce fleshy fruit whose seeds germinate with help from box turtles. Click to see more from this online Opinion feature. (Photos: Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times, left; Douglas W. Tallamy, right)

The larvae of these black-and-white-striped butterflies develop on pawpaw plants. Click to see more of this online Opinion feature. (Photos: Randy Harris for The New York Times, left; Douglas W. Tallamy, right)

You might think we gardeners would value plants for what they do. Instead, we value them for what they look like. Too many of us choose beautiful plants from all over the world, without considering their ability to support life within our local ecosystems. Read more of this Opinion essay at the New York Times. (Illustration: Courtney Wotherspoon)

Acalypha hispida. Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Thunbergia mysorensis. Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Abutilon. Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Nicotiana. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Rose. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

A baby robin in a nest in a quince tree. NYC. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

Verbena bonariensis. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

Stinking iris. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

A Miscanthus seedhead. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

Winterberry holly. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

Aster tartaricus ‘Jin Dai’. Photo: Randy Harris for The New York Times

Hollyhock. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Rosa sericea, with red translucent thorns. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times.

Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

A stone birdbath, in the center of a vegetable garden with purple betony around it. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Succulents in Equador. Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Iris ensata. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

A flowering Stewartia. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Onopordum, a thistle, with Verbena bonariensis and Coronation Gold achillea. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times

Purple alliums. Photo: Rob Cardillo for The New York Times