There’s more to see...
Join millions of other people on Pinterest!

Passover Cooking

Delicious dishes for your Seder table.


Passover Cooking

  • 46 Pins

This dessert bar was first published by The New York Times in 1952 in a review of Passover dishes, and later it appeared in the pamphlet “Holiday Desserts: Cakes, Pies and Puddings for Special Occasions.” The traditional fluden is a leavened pastry, but this version is not. Whipped egg whites mixed with matzo meal, egg yolks, sugar and salt bind the layers together. To be certain that the dessert is kosher for Passover, all ingredients must be endorsed as such by “a recognized rabbinical authority,” as our editor June Owen wrote in 1952. (Video: Sara Bonisteel/The New York Times)

This tender, deeply flavored brisket gets its character from two distinct sources. Searing the meat until dark brown gives the sauce a caramelized, intensely brawny taste, while a bracing garnish of fresh horseradish gremolata spiked with parsley and lemon zest adds brightness and a sinus-clearing bite. Make the meat a few days ahead, it only gets better as it rests. But to get the most out of the gremolata, don’t grate the horseradish until an hour or two before serving. If you can’t find fresh horseradish, use 4 cloves minced garlic instead. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

These cookies are less sweet and chewier than many traditional nut macaroons. The recipe is from Eileen Dangoor Khalastchy, an 86-year-old cook and baker who remembers her mother making something similar when the family lived in Iraq. (Photo: Lexey Swall for The New York Times)

Traditional almond macaroons for Passover were never Joan Nathan's thing — too sweet and not chewy enough. Then she met Eileen Dangoor Khalastchy, a Jew who traces her roots to ancient Babylonia, and tried her macaroon recipe from Iraq. (Photo: Lexey Swall for The New York Times)

“I would rather be the kosher Rachael Ray than the kosher Martha Stewart,” Susie Fishbein told our colleague Julia Moskin in 2008, after the release of one of Mrs. Fishbein’s popular “Kosher by Design” cookbooks. “My books speak to harried everyday cooks like me.” This fabulous roast of beef with melted tomatoes and onions serves as an excellent example of her appeal – and the leftovers make incredible sandwiches the next day. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

A recipe for matzo balls with ginger and parsley. (Photo: David Frank/The New York Times)

Delicious recipes for your seder table and beyond. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Endive, romaine and chicory are present on many Sephardic ritual platters, but here these pungent greens form the basis for a salad with a garlicky dressing. Bitter herbs – the maror – are part of the Seder ritual, symbolizing the bitterness of slavery experienced by the Jews in Egypt. Endive, romaine and chicory (for which I’ve substituted radicchio) are present on many Sephardic ritual platters, but often they also appear in salads served with the meal. This can be served as a separate course or as a side dish. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Haroseth. Click the link to read the complete recipe from Joan Nathan. (Photo: Theresa Cassagne for The New York Times)

Matzo ball soup, matzo brei, matzo toffee — those recipes and everything else you need for Passover (think brisket). (Photo: The New York Times)

A recipe for chopped fruits and nuts, with wine and honey. (Photo: Shannon Jensen for The New York Times)

Olive oil makes Ana Benarroch de Bensadón’s bittersweet chocolate mousse kosher for a meat meal. “This is a contemporary dessert from Tangiers, a city with a blend of cultures,” she said. “Originally this recipe included butter and cream, but we replaced it with olive oil, making it ‘parve’ or neutral.” (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for The New York Times)

This chicken dish for Passover comes from Queenie Hallegua, who lives in what used to be the center of the pepper auction run by Jewish merchants in Kochi, India. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York TImes)

One morning during Passover, when I was eating matzo brei but dreaming about bagels and lox, it hit me. If I added smoked salmon to the matzo brei, I’d end up with a heartier twist on another Jewish staple: lox, eggs and onions. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Recipe: Quinoa salad with roasted carrots and frizzled leeks || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Recipe: French almond macaroons || Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times

Recipe: Fried artichokes || Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times

Recipe: Haroseth truffles || Photo: David Frank/The New York Times

Recipe: Endive and apple salad with spiced walnuts || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Recipe: Brandade || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Recipe: Matzo, lox, eggs and onions || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Recipe: Sweet and sour stuffed grape leaves || Photo: Amy Dickerson for The New York Times

Recipe: Pear haroseth with pecans and figs || Photo: Shannon Jensen for The New York Times

Recipe: Braised Greek artichoke bottoms with lemon and olive oil || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Recipe: Turkish spinach with tomatoes and rice || Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times