Spring Cooking

Welcome the season with flashes of green and other spring delicacies.
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This savory frittata will take about 15 minutes, including the cooking time, putting weeknight dinner on the fast track. (Photo: Jim Wilson/The New York Times)

You can serve tabbouleh as a side dish to simply grilled or roasted meats or fish. And it’s a natural with falafel, either homemade or ordered in. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

It’s easy to find an occasion to serve this cake — breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner or snacktime will do. The dominant flavor here is the berries. Don’t be tempted to increase the amount of walnuts in the topping — scarcity makes them even more delightful. (Photo: Lisa Nicklin for The New York Times)

From butter-braised asparagus to lemon gelato, here are the NYT Cooking recipes that were saved the most in April 2016. (Photo: Evan Sung for NYT; Lisa Nicklin for NYT; Meredith Heuer for NYT)

This rave-worthy pie showcases perfectly the classic combination of sweet strawberries with tart rhubarb. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Pea soup at the Spotted Pig. (Photo: Pablo Enriquez for The New York Times)

Here, ribbons of raw asparagus are simply dressed with a nutty vinaigrette of toasted sesame seeds, sesame oil and rice vinegar. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Here, raw asparagus is simply dressed with lemon juice, olive oil and Parmesan shavings. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Finding a 30-minute dish that's elegant enough for a dinner party is no simple task, but this warm-weather pasta is one to fit the bill. It is gleefully easy to put together. (Photo: Craig Lee for The New York Times)

Strawberries are perhaps best enjoyed unadulterated, at least at the beginning of the season, when the thrill of their newness is fresh. Later on, it’s time to tinker. Crème anglaise, a cooked but marginally thickened custard, is just the thing. By jolting the custard with toasted almonds, you get just something a little more interesting than the vanilla-scented one, and with only a tad more work. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

The star of this herb-flecked Persian-style rice recipe, by the actor and food blogger Naz Deravian, is the lavash tahdig — a crisp, buttery layer of toasted lavash flatbread at the bottom of the pot. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Kuku is a traditional Persian egg dish similar to a frittata. This version by the Iranian food writer Najmieh Batmanglij was served at the White House at Michelle Obama's Nowruz celebration on April 6. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Learn how to choose the best asparagus, and master a variety of cooking methods for this springtime favorite. (Photo: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

Inspired by a wonderful dessert in the pastry chef Sherry Yard’s “Desserts by the Yard,” this is a beautifully layered jello. First make the lemon gelée – even better if you have Meyer lemons at your disposal – and let it set in the glasses (this will take about an hour, so plan accordingly). Then make the blood orange jelly and pour on top of the lemon layer. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

This is a green bean salad with quinoa as opposed to a quinoa salad with green beans. Red quinoa is secondary to the green beans here. The two ingredients provide a colorful contrast. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

With their intense character, artichokes can be hard to pair with other big personalities. But bone-in chicken pieces are amenable, and go nicely with the everything else in the pan. Plus, adding chicken turns a side dish into a meal, without much more work. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Nectarines and peaches work equally well here, as long as they're ripe and sweet. You can find almond powder, also called almond flour, in markets that sell baking supplies. The thin layer under the fruit will absorb juice so that the crust doesn't get soggy. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

There's a kind of magic in a summer recipe that you can make wherever you are, provided that wherever you are has, say, flour, butter, an oven and whatever fruit is most glorious is at that very moment. This is one such recipe, so simple that you can decide that you're having shortcake for dessert and make it so within the hour, and so satisfying that it may become your go-to for summer, the recipe you keep in your back pocket. (Suzy Allman for The New York Times)

A little honey and a little heat transform a typical block of feta into something soft, luscious and spectacular. (Photo: Mikkel Vang for The New York Times)

The imagination has no limitations, as we see from this recipe It’s chocolate pudding, chopped chocolate, whipped cream and raspberries layered over brownies, repeatedly It’s a fairy tale dessert to satisfy all comers. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

For the first-of-the-season asparagus, keep it simple with butter, lemon and sweet herbs. For the best texture, peeling the stalks really makes a difference. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

If you believe, as many do, that asparagus should be celebrated as a sure sign of spring and is best eaten only during its relatively short season, you know something about the joy of anticipation. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

For this braised lettuce — especially ambrosial if, as suggested here, a discreet anchovy or 10 are permitted — everything is fast and minimal. Put thin wedges of lettuce to quickly and lightly wilt in warm butter and broth and spoon it over hot bread. That’s all. (Photo: Davide Luciano for The New York Times)

Learn how to choose the best asparagus, and master a variety of cooking methods for this springtime favorite. (Photos: Karsten Moran for The New York Times)

In this complexly flavored and highly sophisticated dish from the cookbook author Louisa Shafia, tamarind, caramelized onion, ground almonds and barberries are made into a thick and tangy paste that gets spread over fish fillets before baking. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)