Here is the hamburger you get in better taverns and bars, plump and juicy, with a thick char that gives way to tender, medium-rare meat. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

This is the traditional, griddled hamburger of diners and takeaway spots, smashed thin and cooked crisp on its edges. It is best to cook in a heavy, cast-iron skillet slicked with oil or fat, and not on a grill. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

In 2011, Alex Witchel got this recipe from the chef Tadashi Ono, who made it for a pairing with rose Champagne, during an interview with the restaurateur Rita Jammet. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

The burgers are a take on a dish served in Xi’an, the capital city of Shaanxi province in northwestern China, at the easternmost terminus of the Silk Road. Cumin and chile, along with some Sichuan peppercorns if you can find them, bring a bright funkiness to ground lamb, which crisps up beautifully on top of a bed of sautéed red onion and jalapeño pepper. (Photo: Grant Cornett for The New York TImes)

If you finely grind part of the salmon, it will bind the rest, which can be coarsely chopped to retain its moisture during cooking. Some bread crumbs keep the burger from becoming as densely packed as (bad) meatloaf. This approach, along with a few simple seasonings, produce delicious burgers in not much more time than it takes to make one from ground chuck. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

The famed burger at Joe Allen. “As you take the last bite of your hamburger, the bun should disintegrate in your mouth,” he said. (Photo: Todd Heisler/The New York Times)

The French butcher Yves-Marie Le Bourdonnec considers the T-bone to be the best steak to grind for burgers. This is his recipe. (Photo: Ed Alcock for The New York Times)

This burger is a riff on steak tartare. You'll knead a mixture of chopped sun-dried tomatoes and tangy cornichons and capers into the ground meat. Parmesan shavings stand in for the usual Cheddar. (Photo: Ed Alcock for The New York Times)

This Cheddar cheeseburger, with pine nuts and thyme mixed into the meat, sits on a toasted whole-wheat English muffin pedestal. In a wink at the restaurant’s egg theme and recalling the time-honored steak à cheval, a fried egg is placed on top. (Photo: Ed Alcock for The New York Times)

These simple veggie burgers – just mushrooms, beans, garlic, oats, spices and soy sauce – come together in a snap. They're so hearty, even meatlovers will devour them. (Photo: Michael Kraus for The New York Times)

The burger at the Spotted Pig. (Photo: Pablo Enriquez for The New York Times)

The Salvation Burger, a tall, tender half-pound patty of ground beef with cheese and mushrooms on a sesame seed bun. (Photo: Emon Hassan for The New York Times)

The beef burgers come in two forms, which one might refer to as highbrow (the Salvation Burger) and lowbrow (the Classic). (Photo: Emon Hassan for The New York Times)

The double-decker Classic at Salvation Burger, a restaurant from the chef April Bloomfield. (Photo: Emon Hassan for The New York Times)

The burger arrives on a sesame bun, with the juices live and running. Customers have called it one of New York’s best, halal or no. (Photo: Yana Paskova for The New York Times)

After some stumbles (the company had to close nine of its 57 outlets in 2010), Ted Turner’s restaurant business is back on a path of expansion. Here, the Avalon bison burger. (Photo: Dustin Chambers for The New York Times)

Here’s a burger that should go between slices of Yorkshire pudding. The butchers at Lobel’s are grinding prime rib — trimmings, not the Sunday dinner slab — for burgers. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Xi’an-style lamb burgers, brightened by spices, with sautéed onions and jalapeños. (Photo: Grant Cornett for The New York Times)

This recipe came from a revelation in the ’70s, when my friend Semeon Tsalbins introduced me to the lamb burger. It is ground lamb — shoulder is best — highly seasoned and grilled rare. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for The New York Times)

This is a souped-up beef burger made with traditional steak tartare seasonings. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for The New York Times)

For this burger, you need fat. Pork shoulder is almost imperative for the correct balance of lean and fat. You need strong spices; as a starting point, you cannot beat fennel seeds and black pepper. And you need adequate salt, an essential in any good burger. (Photo: Francesco Tonelli for The New York Times)

Japanese Burgers With Wasabi Ketchup by The New York Times | Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Light Brioche Buns. Click the link to get the complete recipe from NYTCooking.com. (Photo: Kevin Scanlon for The New York Times)

Pronounced PLYESS-ka-vee-tsa, this burger as wide as a birthday cake is beloved in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia and Montenegro; and more recently in Italy, Germany, Chicago as well as Queens. (Photo: Evan Sung for The New York Times)

These high-protein burgers are a great way to edge away from beef and still feel like you’re eating a burger. If you sear them quickly they’ll be nice and moist. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)