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The super-powers of supernovae

Caught For The First Time: The Early Flash Of An Exploding Star-shock wave in the visible light spectrum.

Quantum physics for the terminally confused | Cosmos

With new papers on the baffling world of quantum mechanics appearing all the time, we thought it would be helpful if our resident physicist Cathal O'Connell

100 Best YouTube Videos for Science Teachers

Here is truly one of the most unusual house plants you'll ever see. Its a Venus Fly Trap that is ready to feed. Venus Fly Traps eat insects and are one of the most unusual plants ever.

20 best books about women in science

Dale DeBakcsy, the man behind The Illustrated Women In Science comic series, shares the 20 best women in science books to read and own.

jiwis machines

New Zealand Science Teacher is a unique publication that proudly celebrates local scientific and education endeavour.

jiwis machines

New Zealand Science Teacher is a unique publication that proudly celebrates local scientific and education endeavour.

It should not come as a surprise to you that our planet, with its atmosphere and everything on it, is constantly spinning. At the equator the speed of rotation is about 1,675 kilometres per hour (1,040 mph), which means that right this very moment,...

It should not come as a surprise to you that our planet, with its atmosphere and everything on it, is constantly spinning. At the equator the speed of rotation is about kilometres per hour mph), which means that right this very moment,.

article on NZ Science Teacher about a collaboration between researchers and primary teachers.

New Zealand Science Teacher is a unique publication that proudly celebrates local scientific and education endeavour.

Students from around the region gathered to celebrate the best of the Cawthron Science and Technology Fair projects.

Students from around the region gathered to celebrate the best of the Cawthron Science and Technology Fair projects.

'We've always been disturbed by the absence of aliens' : Oxford University astrophysics professor Chris Lintott

Aliens should exist - but where are they all? An Oxford professor of astrophysics explains what's going on with the seach for extraterrestrial life.

It’s still costly and inefficient. So why do we keep doing it?

It’s still costly and inefficient.