Obs. Mont-Mégantic

Obs. Mont-Mégantic

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Mont-mégantic / L'Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, une des composantes du CRAQ, dispose d'un télescope de type Ritchey-Chrétien de 1,6m de diamètre. Il s'agit du plus grand téles
Obs. Mont-Mégantic
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The two largest pieces of the Universe that we know the least about, yet nothing less than the ultimate fate of the Universe will be determined by them. (Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)

Dark Energy Dark Matter The two largest pieces of the Universe that we know the least about, yet nothing less than the ultimate fate of the Universe will be determined by them. (Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss) The Universe in a Jelly Bean Jar

NavCam image of Comet 67P/C-G taken on Oct. 23, 2014 and released on May 5. The image shows a feature of the comet known as the cliffs of Hathor, which are roughly 2,952 feet (900 meters) high. <br />

Rosetta: The Seth & Hathor regions of comet Taken October from a distance of km. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO / Exploration Images

M2-9: Wings of a Butterfly Nebula    Credit:  Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA -  Processing:  Judy Schmidt

Behold the planetary nebula, aka Minkowski’s Butterfly, aka the Wings of a Butterfly Nebula, aka the Twin Jet Nebula. Discovered by Rudolph Minkowski in resides rougly light-years away from Earth towards the constellation Ophiuchus.

Pluto-Bound New Horizons Takes a Distant Look at Neptune with labels | NASA

NASA's Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft captured this view of the giant planet Neptune and its large moon Triton.

René Doyon, prof @umontreal, est à Goddard dans la plus grande salle blanche au monde pour suivre l'intégration de notre instrument FGS/NIRISS dans le télescope spatial James Webb. Trouvez-le ! :-)

René Doyon, prof @umontreal, est à Goddard dans la plus grande salle blanche au monde pour suivre l'intégration de notre instrument FGS/NIRISS dans le télescope spatial James Webb. Trouvez-le ! :-)

Saturn's Clouds by the Cassini-Huygens Mission (c) NASA/JPL

Actual photograph of Saturn's uppermost cloud layers looking toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 25 degrees above the ringplane, taken in red light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Aug.