THE FIRST STATUE OF LIBERTY GIVEN TO THE U.S. BY FRANCE WAS A BLACK WOMAN

The first Statue of Liberty given to the the US by France was a black woman that the US turned down so the French made another which is the current in NY Harbor. This is Black Lady Liberty, also made by the French, on the Island of St Martin.

☥ The state of California was named after the mythical Black Queen Califia. According to the story, California was an island where only Black women lived. The women were the most powerful women in the world. When Cortez arrived in California, searching for this mythical queen, her influence on him was so severe, he paid tribute to this powerful Black Woman Queen Califia by naming the state after her. California literally means, “the land where Black women live."

☥ The state of California was named after the mythical Black Queen Califia. According to the story, California was an island where only Black women lived. When Cortez arrived in California, searching for this mythical queen, her influence on him was so po

QUEEN OF SHEBA (960 B.C.)   "I am black but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, As the tents of Kedar, As the curtains of Solomon, Look not upon me because I am black Because the sun hath scorched me." (Song of Solomon)

ڿڰۣ(̆̃̃♥✌✞♫ ✯QUEEN OF SHEBA B.) "I am black but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, As the tents of Kedar, As the curtains of Solomon, Look not upon me because I am black Because the sun hath scorched me." (Song of Solomon)ڿڰۣ(̆̃̃♥✌✞♫ ✯

In 1952, Ruby McCollum, the wealthiest African-American woman in Live Oak, murdered the town’s beloved doctor, a white man named Leroy Adams. She said it was the only way she knew to end six years of rape. The case would help show that a persistent form of bondage plagued the South for a century after the Civil War — “paramour rights,” the assumption that white men had a right to use African-American women for sex.

The Silencing of Ruby McCollum: Race, Class, and Gender in the South: Tammy D…

African history

Malcom X, photographed in Chicago. Eve Arnold© Eve Arnold, Malcolm X, Chicago, 1961

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