THE SLAVES BEST WHITE FRIENDS

Collection by Paul Belz

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Here are the best white friends the slaves ever had. Abraham Lincoln is not among them. Abolitionists generally despised Lincoln, who never made a single speech espousing abolition and whose only emancipation plan was gradual (over 37 years) emancipation accompanied by taxpayer-funded compensation to slave-owners followed by deportation, which he called "colonization" and in a State-of-the-Union address he proposed an amendment to the Constitution to facilitate and fund it.

Paul Belz
Theodore Dwight Weld Abolitionist and Republican who worked to end slavery in the US. Known as a forceful orator, he dedicated himself to the anti-slavery cause in Black History Facts, Us History, African American History, Us Slavery, The Orator, Civil Rights Movement, American Civil War, Black People, Band

Theodore Dwight Weld (1803-1895)

Theodore Dwight Weld. 1803-1895: Abolitionist and Republican who worked to end slavery in the US. Known as a forceful orator, he dedicated himself to the anti-slavery cause in 1830. He helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society and in 1836 the society decided to devote all its resources towards enlarging the band of trained lecture agents to spread the abolitionist gospel. He was known to speak 8 to 10 hours a day.

Maria Weston Chapman. 1806-1885: An American abolitionist. She was elected to the executive committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1839, and from 1839 until 1842, she served as editor of the anti-slavery journal "Non-Resistant." Around 1855, she endorsed the Republican party and later  supported both the American Civil War and Abraham Lincoln’s proposal in 1862 for gradual, compensated slave emancipation. American Freedom, American Civil War, Women In History, Black History, Black Republicans, Historical Photos, Historical Fun, Frederick Douglass, African Diaspora

MHS Collections Online: Maria Weston Chapman

Massachusetts Historical Society, Collections Online: Maria Weston Chapman

Levi Coffin – a Quaker businessman deeply involved in the Underground Railroad in Indiana and Ohio. His home is often called "Grand Central Station of the Underground Railroad" because of the thousands of slaves who passed through his care. Us History, History Facts, Family History, Black History, African American Culture, Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman, Family Genealogy, Persecution

Levi Coffin; 1798-1877; Ohio abolitionist nicknamed “President of the Underground Railroad” for helping over 2,000 slaves escape.

Elisha Tyson; 1749-1824; Quaker helped found the “Maryland Society for the Abolition of Slavery” in 1789, the state’s first abolitionist group; in 1797 he opened the “African Academy,” Baltimore’s first permanent school for blacks; he operated a “safe house” on the Underground Railroad and organized groups to combat kidnappers of free blacks and runaway slaves; he endured many threats to burn his home and take his life (one at pistol point). Thousands of blacks attended his funeral. Underground Railroad, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Maryland, American Revolution, Historical Costume, African American History, History Facts, My People, World History

Elisha Tyson; 1749-1824; Quaker helped found the “Maryland Society for the Abolition of Slavery” in 1789, the state’s first abolitionist group; in 1797 he opened the “African Academy,” Baltimore’s first permanent school for blacks; he operated a “safe house” on the Underground Railroad and organized groups to combat kidnappers of free blacks and runaway slaves; he endured many threats to burn his home and take his life (one at pistol point). Thousands of blacks attended his funeral.

Great Speeches Collection: William Lloyd Garrison Speech - On the Death of John Brown American Civil War, American History, Civil War Quotes, William Lloyd Garrison, Women Right To Vote, Suffrage Movement, Frederick Douglass, Before Us, Civil Rights

William Lloyd Garrison; 1805-1879; editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator; one of the founders of The American Anti-slavery Society; in The Liberator on January 1, 1831 he became the first notable American to espouse “immediate emancipation” rather than the generally accepted (Lincoln included) liberal goal of gradual emancipation, which he considered unacceptable and immoral. His position helped make abolitionism part of the national conversation.

File:Honorable William Pitt Fessenden of Maine Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Abraham Lincoln Civil War, Abraham Lincoln Life, American Civil War, American History, Fes, Us Senate, Mr President, Greatest Presidents, Civil War Photos

William Pitt Fessenden; 1806-1869; a lawyer, he was a leading antislavery Whig in Maine; in Congress, He built an antislavery coalition in the state legislature that elected him to the US Senate; it became Maine's Republican organization. In the Senate, Fessenden played a central role in the debates on Kansas, denouncing the expansion of slavery. Fessenden's speeches influenced Republicans such as Lincoln and built support for Lincoln's 1860 Republican presidential nomination.

Zachariah Chandler - Secretary Of The Interior American Civil War, American History, Underground Railroad, Civil War Photos, Republican Party, Civil Rights, Family History, Secretary, Politicians

Zachariah Chandler; 1813-1879; New Hampshire native was a founder of the Republican Party, a lifelong abolitionist, mayor of Detroit, 4-term senator from Michigan, and Secretary of Interior under President Grant. He advocated civil rights for freed slaves, financially supported Detroit's Underground Railroad, spoke out against the Dred Scott Decision and the Fugitive Slave Law & was friends with Lyman Trumbull and Benjamin Wade.

Laura Smith Haviland was an American abolitionist, suffragette, and social reformer. She was an important figure in the history of the Underground Railroad. American Women, American History, Civil Rights Leaders, Visual And Performing Arts, Underground Railroad, Great Women, American Civil War, Landscape Photography, Portrait

Laura Smith Haviland. 1808-1898: The Quaker Haviland family hid runaway slaves in the 1830s, the first Underground Railroad station in Michigan. They opened Michigan’s first integrated school, the “Raisin Institute” in 1837. As a widow, Laura continued to shelter fugitive slaves, personally escorting some to Canada. She traveled to the South on multiple occasions to aid escaped slaves and had a $3,000 bounty placed on her head (dead or alive). She became close friends with Sojourner Truth.

John Gregg Fee was born in Bracken County, Kentucky on September the first child of John Fee, Jr. and Sarah Gregg Free. Slavery History, John Rankin, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Shape Sort, Underground Railroad, Book Letters, Frederick Douglass, Women Names

John Rankin; 1793-1886; Presbyterian minister became one of Ohio's first & most active Underground Railroad conductors. His writings influenced Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Henry Ward Beecher who when asked after the Civil War "Who abolished slavery?" answered, "Reverend John Rankin and his sons did." The Rankin House is a U. S. National Historic Landmark. He helped form the American Anti-Slavery Society and wrote the book "Letters on Slavery" that inspired Garrison.

Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd-Angelina and Sarah Grimke - Born in Charleston, South Carolina, the Grimke sisters were Quakers and early, outspoken advocates of both abolitionism and women's rights. Us History, Women In History, Great Women, Amazing Women, American Women, American History, The Invention Of Wings, My Escape, Strong Women

1806-1879; Angelina W. Grimké; 1792-1893, Sarah M. Grimké; the sisters were raised on a large South Carolina slave plantation but became radical abolitionists, living and working together. In 1836 Angelina wrote “An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South,” which won the sisters an invitation to the Agents’ Convention of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York. Their abolitionist lectures became extremely popular.

Newspaper article concerning the fire that destroyed Morbid Manor. 2 of Volunteer Firefighter, Ocean City, 20 Years Old, Historical Photos, Newspaper Article, Maryland, Scrapbook, Friends, House

Newspaper article concerning the fire that destroyed Morbid Manor. 2 of 4.

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A unique crossbow collection How To Make Metal, How To Find Out, Bavaria Germany, Crossbow, 16th Century, Metal Art, Weapons, Armour, Scenery

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A unique crossbow collection

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Erastus Hussey; 1800-1889; he and wife Sarah were strong Quakers & abolitionists whose Battle Creek, Michigan home became an important Underground Railroad station, helping over 1,000 to Canada. He published an abolitionist newspaper called the Michigan Liberty Press. As a state senator he helped found the Republican Party. He drafted state legislation outlawing the capture of runaway slaves in Michigan. Manchester Street, Battle Creek, Underground Railroad, Republican Party, Newspaper, Liberty, Michigan, Washington, Corner

Erastus Hussey; 1800-1889; he and wife Sarah were strong Quakers & abolitionists whose Battle Creek, Michigan home became an important Underground Railroad station, helping over 1,000 to Canada. He published an abolitionist newspaper called the Michigan Liberty Press. As a state senator he helped found the Republican Party. He drafted state legislation outlawing the capture of runaway slaves in Michigan.

Lucretia Coffin Mott was an American Quaker, abolitionist, a women's rights activist, and a social reformer. She helped write the Declaration of Sentiments during the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Women Rights, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, History For Kids, Women In History, Family History, Seneca Falls Convention, Historic Philadelphia

Lucretia Mott; 1793-1880; a Quaker minister, abolitionist & women's rights advocate who refused to use cotton, sugar & other slave products; she & husband James helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833 and she was the only woman to speak at the organizational meeting in Philadelphia; with other white and black women she helped found the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and she was one of only 6 women delegates to the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840.

June Prudence Crandall, a white woman, is arrested for conducting an academy for black women in Canterbury, Conn.one of my ancestors! History Major, Today In History, Women In History, Black History, Sarah Harris, Rhode Island, Connecticut History, Afro, African American Girl

Prudence Crandall; 1803-1890; A Baptist woman who opened a school for black girls in 1833 in rural, eastern Connecticut with sponsorship from 15 abolitionist leaders including William Lloyd Garrison, Samuel May, and brothers Arthur and Lewis Tappan. She and her students experienced life-threatening violence in her town of Canterbury and Crandall was arrested for violating the Black Laws and put on trial in 1834. Continued violence forced her to close the school and move to Kansas.

Moncure Daniel Conway - Minister, writer, and abolitionist Divinity School, Founding Fathers, American Civil War, Inspirational Thoughts, Harvard, Bearded Men, The Dreamers, Einstein, Virginia

Moncure Conway; 1832-1907; born to Virginia slaveholder & became abolitionist after watching lynching, recognized as only descendant of a “Founding Father” to lead slaves to freedom; mother was granddaughter of Thomas Stone; he led several dozen of his father’s escaped slaves from Georgetown to Ohio; married an abolitionist and lived last portion of life in England as family outcast; prolific writer educated at Dickinson & Harvard Divinity; became editor of anti-slavery weekly…

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