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Presidents of the United States

Under the United States Constitution, the President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States. As chief of the executive branch and head of the federal government as a whole, the presidency is the highest political office in the United States by influence and recognition. The president is also the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. The president is indirectly elected to a four-year term by an Electoral College.


Presidents of the United States

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Plaster ceiling medallion installed in 1934 includes elements of the Seal of the President of the United States.

The Seal of the President of the United States is used to mark correspondence from the U.S. president to the United States Congress, and is also used as a symbol of the presidency. The central design, based on the Great Seal of the United States, is the official coat of arms of the U.S. presidency and also appears on the presidential flag.

Barack Hussein Obama II (born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States. He is the first African American to hold the office. Obama served as a U.S. Senator representing the state of Illinois from January 2005 to November 2008, when he resigned following his victory in the 2008 presidential election.

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and businessman who was the 43rd President of the United States from 2001 to 2009 and Governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000. He is the oldest son of Barbara & George H. W. Bush. 8 months into Bush's first term as president, the Sept 11, 2001 terrorist attacks occurred. In response, Bush announced the War on Terror. He also promoted policies on the economy, health care, education, and social security reform.

William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III; August 19, 1946) is an American politician who served as the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. He took office at the end of the Cold War, and was the first president of the baby boomer generation. Clinton has been described as a New Democrat. Many of his policies have been attributed to a centrist Third Way philosophy of governance.

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 41st President of the United States (1989–93). He had previously served as the 43rd Vice President of the United States (1981–89), a congressman, an ambassador, a Director of Central Intelligence, and is currently the oldest surviving president.

Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981-89). Prior to that, he was Governor of California, and a radio, film and television actor. As president, Reagan implemented sweeping new political and economic initiatives. His supply-side economic policies, dubbed "Reaganomics", advocated reducing tax rates to spur economic growth, controlling the money supply to reduce inflation, deregulation of the economy, and reducing government spending.

James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States (1977–1981) and was the recipient of the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize, the only U.S. President to have received the Prize after leaving office. Before he became President, Carter served as a U.S. Naval officer, was a peanut farmer, served two terms as a Georgia State Senator and one as Governor of Georgia (1971–1975).

Gerald Rudolph "Jerry" Ford, Jr. (1913-2006) was the 38th President of the United States, serving from 1974 to 1977, and the 40th Vice President of the United States serving from 1973 to 1974. As the first person appointed to the vice-presidency under the terms of the 25th Amendment (after Agnew had resigned), when he became President upon Richard Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974, he became the only President of the United States who was never elected.

Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. Nixon was the only president to resign the office,

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973), was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969), a position he assumed after his service as the 37th Vice President of the United States (1961–1963). He is one of only four people who served in all four elected federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President, and President. He succeeded to the presidency following the assassination of John F. Kennedy on Nov 22, 1963, and was elected President in his own right in 1964.

Lyndon B. Johnson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy (1917-1963), often referred to by his initials JFK, was the 35th President of the United States, serving from 1961 until his assassination on November 22, 1963.

John F. Kennedy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (1890-1969) was the 34th President of the United States from 1953 until 1961. He had previously been a five-star general in the United States Army during World War II, and served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe. Eisenhower's two terms were peaceful ones for the most part and saw considerable economic prosperity except for a sharp recession in 1958–59. Eisenhower is now often ranked as one of the top ten U.S. Presidents.

Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) was the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953). As President Franklin D. Roosevelt's third vice president and the 34th Vice President of the United States (1945), he succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945, when President Roosevelt died less than three months after beginning his unprecedented fourth term.

Harry S. Truman

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt ( 1882-1945), also known by his initials, FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States (1933–1945) and a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the US during a time of worldwide economic depression & total war. The only American president elected to more than two terms, he facilitated a durable coalition that realigned American politics for decades. FDR's unfailing optimism & activism contributed to a renewal of the national spirit.

Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) was the 31st President of the United States (1929–1933). Hoover was originally a professional mining engineer and author. Hoover, a trained engineer, believed in the Efficiency Movement, which held that the government & the economy were riddled with inefficiency & waste, and could be improved by experts who could identify the problems & solve them. He believed in the importance of volunteerism & the importance of individuals in American society and the economy.

John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. (1872 –1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–1929). A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state. He was elected as the 29th Vice President in 1920 and succeeded to the Presidency upon the death of Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative, and also as a man who said very little.

Calvin Coolidge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865 –1923) was the 29th President of the United States (1921–1923). A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential self-made newspaper publisher. His "America first" campaign encouraged industrialization and a strong economy independent of foreign influence. Harding departed from the progressive movement that had dominated Congress since President Theodore Roosevelt.

Warren G. Harding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856 –1924) was the 28th President of the United States, from 1913 to 1921.A Democrat himself, Wilson persuaded a Democratic Congress to pass major progressive reforms. Historian John M. Cooper argues that, in his first term, Wilson successfully pushed a legislative agenda that few presidents have equaled, and remained unmatched up until the New Deal.

Woodrow Wilson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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William Howard Taft (1857-1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909–1913) and later the tenth Chief Justice of the United States (1921–1930). He is the only person to have served in both of these offices. Taft's domestic agenda emphasized trust-busting, civil service reform, strengthening the Interstate Commerce Commission, improving the performance of the postal service, and passage of the Sixteenth Amendment.

William Howard Taft - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt (1858-1919) was the 26th President of the United States of America (1901–1909). He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona. Roosevelt was also one of only three sitting presidents to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the other two being Woodrow Wilson and Barack Obama.

William McKinley (1843-1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1897, until his death. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals. McKinley's administration ended with his assassination in September 1901.

Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901) was the 23rd President of the United States (1889–1893). Harrison, a grandson of President William Henry Harrison. His administration is most remembered for economic legislation, including the McKinley Tariff and the Sherman Antitrust Act, and for annual federal spending that reached one billion dollars for the first time.

Stephen Grover Cleveland (1837–1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. Cleveland is the only president to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897) and therefore is the only individual to be counted twice in the numbering of the presidents. He was the winner of the popular vote for president three times—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was the only Democrat elected to the presidency in the era of Republican political domination that lasted from 1861 to 1913.

Grover Cleveland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Chester Alan Arthur (1829 –1886) was the 21st President of the United States (1881–1885). Becoming President after the assassination of President James A. Garfield, Arthur struggled to overcome suspicions of his beginnings as a politician from the New York City Republican machine, succeeding at that task by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration.

Chester A. Arthur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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