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    scientists memorialized

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    Eddie, that would be you. But only when your ass texts me first with pictures of food I can't eat, because I'm having a colonoscopy the next day! You ass! ;0)

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    “Why do I get the pink one?”

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    Nelson Mandela

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    Jodie Foster in 1980

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    John F. Kennedy

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    Statler and Waldorf!

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    Tammy Duckworth, former assistant secretary of the US Department of Veterans Affairs (at the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.),lost her legs in combat while piloting a Black Hawk helicopter. “When I’m asked if the country is ready for women in combat, I look down at where my legs used to be and think, ‘Where do you think this happened, a bar fight?’” (Photo courtesy of the Christian Science Monitor.)

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    Jamie Oliver

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    Quote from Jesse Owens regarding the 1936 Olympics in Berlin: "Hitler didn't snub me – it was FDR who snubbed me. The president didn't even send me a telegram." On the other hand, Hitler sent Owens a commemorative inscribed cabinet photograph of himself.

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    Joss Whedon

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    Wilma Rudolph was born prematurely at 4.5 lbs. , with 21 brothers and sisters, and caught infantile paralysis (caused by the polio virus) as a very young child. She recovered, but wore a brace on her left leg and foot which had become twisted as a result. Rudolph became the fastest woman in the world in the 1960s and competed in two Olympic Games, in 1956 and in 1960. She became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field.

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    Rosa Parks & Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Ali

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    King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”

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    Dorothy Counts, one of four black students chosen to integrate various high schools in North Carolina. Dorothy Counts was taunted by, spit on, and harassed by other white classmates during her first four days of school 50 years ago on September 4, 1957.

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    Demonstration at the Greyhound Bus station in Stuttgart, Arkansas, showing a woman holding a sign that reads: “Sit Down Like Human Beings”. SNCC Arkansas Project. 1965

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    August 3, 1936 - Jesse Owens wins the 100m sprint at the Summer Olympics in Berlin

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    THE FIRST STATUE OF LIBERTY GIVEN TO THE U.S. BY FRANCE WAS A BLACK WOMAN THAT THE U.S. TURNED DOWN SO THE FRENCH MADE ANOTHER WHICH IS THE CURRENT IN N.Y. HARBOR THIS IS BLACK LADY LIBERTY MADE ALSO BY THE FRENCH ON THE ISLAND OF ST. MARTIN. WOMEN OF CREATION WE MUST CONTINUE TO SHINE THE LIGHT FOR THOSE IN NEED…..LIVE FREE!

    afrodesiacworldwide

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    You can't beat me. I'm the greatest!

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    Martin Luther King, Jr. was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African American civil rights movement. On April 4, 1968, King was staying at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, while standing on the motel’s second floor balcony he was shot once through his right cheek. Martin Luther King Jr. was pronounced dead at St. Joseph's Hospital an hour later.

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    Morecambe & Wise

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    Back in 1989, on a rainy afternoon, seven-year-old Amy wrote a letter to Roald Dahl. Using oil, coloured water and glitter, Amy sent the author a personal gift: one of her dreams, contained in a bottle. Here’s Roald Dahl’s wonderful response.

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    Love

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    “The worst illness of our time is that so many people have to suffer from never being loved.” Princess Di

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