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    Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. It causes brown heart rot on conifers, and is found in Europe, Asia, and North America, as well as Morocco. It is commonly known as agarikon, as well as the quinine conk due to its extremely bitter taste. DNA analysis supports L. officinalis as being distinct from the genus Fomitopsis. "The decay is common only in a few old-growth stands. The conks were once collected extensively for production of medicinal quinine.

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    9 comments

    • Adele Snyman

      Out on a limb... Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. This species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form...

    • a.m.f.

      "Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. This species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form..." -- to me, this looks like the Michelen Man, sitting in a tree...

    • jolea924

      Laricifomes officinaliswood-decay fungus species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form of columns.

    • Moi

      Bread of ghosts sitting in a tree. This species bears fruit in the form of columns. It grows on wood, mainly coniferous. Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest used it to mark graves. Bitter taste makes it inedible.

    • Bonnie Koenig

      Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. This species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form of columns. Lacriformes grows on wood, primarily coniferous trees and has a very bitter taste which makes it inedible.

    • Pintristed

      Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. This species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form of columns. Lacriformes grows on wood, primarily coniferous...

    • Patty Stagg

      Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. This species can reach great dimensions and bears fruit in the form of columns. Lacriformes grows on wood, primarily coniferous trees and has a very bitter taste which makes it inedible. The indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest called it ‘the bread of the ghosts’ and used it to mark graves.  In ancient times it was used to treat tuberculosis, smallpox and other diseases.

    • D Roberts

      Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. It causes brown heart rot on conifers, and is found in Europe, Asia, and North America, as well as Morocco. It is commonly known as agarikon, as well as the quinine conk due to its extremely bitter taste. DNA analysis supports L. officinalis as being distinct from the genus Fomitopsis. "The decay is common only in a few old-growth stands. The conks were once collected extensively for production of medicinal quinine.

    • ora motherearth

      Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus

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