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Laricifomes officinalis is a wood-decay fungus in the order Polyporales. It causes brown heart rot on conifers, and is found in Europe, Asia, and North America, as well as Morocco. It is commonly known as agarikon, as well as the quinine conk due to its extremely bitter taste. DNA analysis supports L. officinalis as being distinct from the genus Fomitopsis. "The decay is common only in a few old-growth stands. The conks were once collected extensively for production of medicinal quinine.

Polyporus Squamosus (yet to be confirmed new taxonomy) is a Basidiomycete bracket fungus, with common names including Dryad's Saddle and Pheasant's Back mushroom. It has a widespread distribution, being found in North America, Australia, Asia, and Europe, where it causes a white rot in the heartwood of living and dead hardwood trees.

Xylaria polymorpha, commonly known as dead man's fingers, is a saprobic fungus.

The largest living organism ever found has been discovered in an ancient American forest. The Armillaria ostoyae, popularly known as the honey mushroom, started from a single spore too small to see without a microscope. It has been spreading its black shoestring filaments, called rhizomorphs, through the forest for an estimated 2,400 years, killing trees as it grows. It now covers 2,200 acres (880 hectares) of the Malheur National Forest, in eastern Oregon.

from eBay

40 Plants That Attract Hummingbirds

Love hummingbirds? There are many different flowering plants you can add to your garden or balcony to attract and nourish these beautiful birds. Have a look at the suggestions and see what would work in your yard. Hummingbirds, like bees and butterflies,

Marasmius Rotula is a common species of Agaric fungus in the family Marasmiaceae. Widespread in the Northern Hemisphere, it is commonly known variously as the Pinwheel Mushroom, the Pinwheel Marasmius, the Little Wheel, the Collared Parachute, or the Horse Hair Fungus. The type species of the genus Marasmius, M. rotula was first described scientifically in 1772 by mycologist Giovanni Antonio Scopoli and assigned its current name in 1838 by Elias Fries.

from BrightSide — Inspiration. Creativity. Wonder.

12 houseplants that can survive even the darkest corner

House plants for dark corners http://brightside.me/creativity-home/12-houseplants-that-can-survive-even-the-darkest-corner-111155/

Amanita abrupta, commonly known as the American abrupt-bulbed Lepidella. Photo by Dan Molter (shroomydan)