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Doc Holliday #4 - He still practiced dentistry on the side from his rooms in Fort Griffin and Dodge City, as indicated in an 1878 Dodge newspaper ad, but this is the last known time he attempted to practice. He was primarily a gambler, despite a reputation as a deadly gunman, research has only identified three instances in which he shot someone. Holliday made his way to Tombstone, Arizona in September 1880. Some accounts say the Earps sent for him when their feud with the Cowboy faction…

Johnny Ringo (aka John Peters) (May 3, 1850 – July 13, 1882) was an outlaw Cowboy of the American Old West who was affiliated with Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell in Cochise County, Arizona Territory during 1881-1882.

Wild Bill Hickok | Cowboys, Native American, American History, Wild West, American Indians | thewildwest.org

Better known as Johnny Ringo, John Peters Ringo (May 3, 1850–July 13, 1882), was a cowboy who became a legend mostly because of his affiliation with the Clanton Gang in the era of the Gunfight at the OK Corral, in Tombstone, Arizona. Ringo was occasionally erroneously referred to as "Ringgold" by the newspapers of the day, but this was clearly not his name, and there is no evidence that he deliberately used it.

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Who Were the Buffalo Soldiers?

Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The nickname was given to the "Negro Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought; the term eventually became synonymous with all of the African-American regiments formed in 1866. "Buffalo Soldiers" were established by Congress as the first peacetime all-black regiments in the regular U.S. Army.

Kit Carson (1809-1868) American frontiersman and Indian fighter--Carson explored the west to California, and north through the Rocky Mountains. He lived among and married into the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes.

Charles Earl Bowles (b. 1829; d.after 1888), better known as Black Bart, was an English-born American Old West outlaw noted for the poetic messages he left behind after two of his robberies. Called Charley by his friends, he was also known as Charles Bolton, C.E. Bolton and Black Bart the Poet.[1] Considered a gentleman bandit, he was one of the most notorious stagecoach robbers to operate in and around Northern California and southern Oregon during the 1870s and 1880s.

In 1906, a massive magnitude 7.9 earthquake ruptured the entire San Andreas Fault in Northern California. Photo courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

The Melungeons (1600s- ) are a mixed-race people in America who live in the Appalachian mountains where Tennessee meets Virginia meets Kentucky. There are about 50,000 of them. They look mainly white nowadays but in the 1690s French traders said they looked like Moors (the Berbers of north-west Africa). They looked neither white nor black nor American Indian.

Laura Bullion was a female outlaw of the Old West. Most sources indicate Bullion was born of German and Native American heritage. Laura Bullion was a member of Butch Cassidy's Wild Bunch gang; her cohorts were fellow outlaws, including the Sundance Kid, "Black Jack" Ketchum, and Kid Curry. For several years in the 1890s, she was romantically involved with outlaw Ben Kilpatrick ("The Tall Texan"), a bank and train robber and an acquaintance of her father, who had been an outlaw, as well.

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The real-life Django: black Wild West marshal Bass Reeves who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men

The real-life Django: The legendary African-American Wild West marshal who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men Bass Reeves was born a slave in 1838 and later broke from his owner to live among Native Americans Reeves became a Deputy U.S. Marshal in 1875 at the age of 38 During his 32-year career as a Deputy Marshal he arrested 3,000 felons, killed 14 men and was never shot